News from Adair County

Posted with Permission

Straight from Gradyville:

The Community Newsletters of

Mr. William M. Wilmore, 1918

Transcribed by

Cyrus

Copyright January 2007 by Cyrus

All rights reserved.

Please respect copyright laws.

 

Straight from Gradyville:

The Newsletters of

 Mr. William M. Wilmore, 1918.

In 1918, the Gradyville correspondent to the Adair County News was by far the most faithful and most prolific of all the newsletter contributors in reporting the day to day life of his community as well as slipping in the occasional editorial opinion and wry observation. Although the Gradyville letter didn't appear every week, it did appear much more frequently than any of the others.

The first paragraph of an essay in the January 23 edition of the News identified the correspondent: "Saturday morning finds me in this thrifty little village [of Gradyville] and at the store of W.M. Wilmore. Mr. Wilmore is the regular contributor from this place to the News..." The store referred to was the Wilmore & Moss general store.

The date shown in boldface type indicates the edition of the News in which the newsletter appeared.

Wednesday, January 9, 1918

W.L. Grady was on the sick list several days last week.

D.C. Wheeler, who has been confined to his room for six weeks, is improving at this time.

Uncle Charlie Yates and Robert O. Keltner, two of our oldest citizens, are enjoying fine health for men of their age.

Austin Wilmore, of Kansas City,  Mo., is spending a few days with his relatives at this place.

We have had plenty of snow and ice for the past month and the prospect good for more. [The winter of 1917-1918 was particularly brutal, with much snow and much lower temperatures than usual.--ed.]

Mrs. Clara W. Sollenbarger, returned to Clinton, La., the first of the week.

R.L. Caldwell and wife, of the Milltown section, visited W.L. Grady and family the first of the holidays.

Garfield Flowers, of St. Louis, Mo., spent a few days here during the holidays with his relatives. He is looking fine.

W.L. Fletcher, who recently purchased James L. Moore's farm near this place, is making some improvements on his farm by putting in a lot of new fence.

Dan Tarter and his wife, of the State of Illinois, is here visiting their relatives. While here Mr. Tarter expects to sell his farm.

James A. Wilmore, of Lexington, came in the first of Christmas and spent a few days with his father and mother.

During the extreme cold weather of last week quite a number of our people ran short of firewood. Our neighbors helped us out.

Thos. Baker and family, Mason City, Ill., are visiting their relatives and friends here at this time.

Quite a number of changes are being made with our farming class of people, in this section, moving from one  farm to another. All are preparing for a big crop of Burley tobacco.

Mrs. Geo. W. Dudley, who has visiting her children in Mason City, Ill. for the past three months returned home the first of the holidays. Her son, Sam, accompanied her home.

Geo. T. Flowers sold last week a very valuable piece of land, in our town, to G.E. Nell and C.O. Moss. Consideration, two hundred dollars per acre.

Owing to the cold weather and snow, the work on Strong Hill's business house has not progressed fast, but will be taken up as soon as the weather will admit and will be pushed to a finish.

Sam Richard, one of the best mill men we ever had here, has been on the sick list for the past two or three weeks.

The high prices of everything that is for sale, has put new life into our people. There will be the greatest effort that was ever known in the history of this section of country for a large crop of everything that is grown out of the mother earth. Our people are now speaking for all the empty tobacco barns that are in reach, that belong to people who do not farm, to rent them for housing tobacco this fall. It is a thing of the past to see men idle about our town. Everybody is wide awake to business. No idlers in our city. We are glad to say that our farmers all made good with their last year's crop, and are now preparing for a much larger one.

Wednesday, January 23, 1918

Mr. D.C. Wheeler, who has been sick for several weeks, is on the stage of action again.

Plenty of snow, rain and ice down this way this week.

W.L. Grady spent a day or so on the tobacco market, at Greensburg, this week.

Mrs. R.O. Keltner was on the sick list several days last week.

Huston Bradshaw, of Bliss, was in our midst last Wednesday.

L.B. Cain and family and Curt Yarberry and family are now citizens of this community. We are certainly glad to have them with us.

Dolphus Rodgers and Clem Rose, of Roachville, were in our midst a day or so last week.

Mrs. W.P. Flowers, who has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. James Hoy, of McGregor, Texas, for several months, returned home last week.

John D. Lowe, the popular shoe drummer of Columbia, was calling on his trade in our town one day last week.

Mr. J.T. Rose and wife, who have been living in our town for the past two or three years, moved a few days ago to the community of Sparksville. Mr. and Mrs. Rose are good people and we are sorry to lose them.

Mr. Luke Sherrill, of Taylor county, who purchased the farm known as the A.T. Sherrill farm, near this place, is now a citizen of our community. We are glad to have him in our midst.

Quite a number of hogs was slaughtered in this community last week. Consequently we have plenty of fresh ribs and sausage.

Mr. Herschel Sherrill and family will leave for Camp Knox in a few days, for their future home. Mr. Sherrill will engage in the milling business.

Mr. Robert Wethington, of Columbia, agent for the Adair Spoke Co., spent a day or so here last week looking after the spoke business for his firm.

Mrs. Millie Hill, who was confined to her room several days of last week with a complication of troubles, has about recovered.

Our old friend and popular groceryman of Burkesville, to-wit, Mr. Horace Alexander, was calling on his trade in our town one day last week, and as usual had a good business.

Quite a number of the citizens from Keltner, Nell and Sparksville, were in our town last week and from what we can find out there will be a great effort from the farming class of people, the coming season for a large crop of tobacco. If our farmers make as much of the weed as they are calculating on, and sell for as good prices as they did in the past season, old Adair will have as much money as she will need for a few years anyway.

Miss Ruby Pedigo, who has been teaching for the past two years,  the present term closed last week.

We can say of a truth that she is one of the best teachers that we have ever had. While the weather has been so very disagreeable, her attendance was not as good as it would have been otherwise, but those who attended advanced rapidly with their studies. Miss Ruby has given universal satisfaction to her pupils and patrons.

Wednesday, January 30, 1918

To-day is the first day of the year that has been comfortable without an overcoat.

Quite a number of our citizens attended court at Columbia last week.

Deputy Sheriff Rowe, of Sparksville, was in our town several days last week, looking after our boys.

Luke Sherrill has been furnishing our people with some fine wood during this cold weather.

Mrs. Robert O. Keltner, who has been confined to her room for several weeks, has about recovered.

Owing to the ice and snow, our mail from this place to Edmonton, was knocked out for ten days.

During the extreme cold weather that we have just gone through with, Uncle Charlie Yates and Robert O. Keltner, two of our oldest citizens, stood the weather just like young men of 20 years of age.

Mr. A. Boston, of Sulphur Well, was in our midst a day or so of last week, on business.

H.A. Walker, of Columbia, the well-known tobacco dealer through this section, was in our midst one day last week, looking after mules.

Mr. G.T. Flowers sold a very valuable span of young mules, last week, to Atkins and Caldwell, of the Milltown section for $300.

Uncle Buck Cook, a well-known citizen of our community, has been in critical condition for the past ten days with lagrippe.

One of the largest hogs that ever was slaughtered in this section, was killed by W.L. Grady, last week. There was no stock scales convenient and we are unable to give you the net weight at this time.

We have not had any preaching or Sabbath school in town, for the past month, owing to the very cold weather and deep snow.

Quite a number of our citizens attended the sale at Allen Keltner's last Thursday. They report a very large attendance and everything sold for full value and especially the farming tools and live stock. Mr. Keltner will leave in a short time for Logan county, where he bought a valuable farm. Mr. Keltner is one of our best farmers and a  good citizen and we can heartily recommend him and family to any community.

We regret to learn through Mr. Hill that his son, Ed, who has been in the service for more than a year and is stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, is now confined to the hospital. This is the second time since the enlistment of Mr. Hill. We trust that he may soon be restored to his usual health, for he is certainly a good boy.

Miss Christine, the accomplished daughter of Dr. and Mrs. L.C. Nell, received a considerable wound last Sunday, from a burn while starting a fire in her heating stove. Her father also got a severe burn while extinguishing the fire. We are glad to note that Miss Christine is getting along nicely. It will only be a few days until she will be on the stage of action again.

Mr. Amos Keltner, who has been one of the salesmen at Wilmore & Moss' store for the past two years, tendered his resignation a few days ago, and has purchased one-half interest in the general store of G.E. Nell, at this place. Mr. Keltner is a good business man, and we wish him much success in his new place of business. We know of no man that we would have as competitor than Mr. Keltner.

In conclusion we must say that we all enjoyed reading the contribution from the man "On the Road," in the last issue in the News, from his write up on Cane Valley, Milltown and Gradyville. [The "On the Road" write up for Gradyville immediately follows this entry.--ed.] We want to hear from him again. Uncle Charlie Yates joins in with your writer, soliciting him to let himself be known on his next visit to our town. We will take great pleasure in showing him through our city and getting acquainted

with some of the best people on earth. Let us hear from you again.

The "On the Road" piece (author unknown) from the January 23, 1918 Adair County News:

Gradyville.

Saturday morning finds me in this thrifty little village and at the store of W.M. Wilmore. Mr. Wilmore is the regular contributor from this place to the News, and I found that he had already sent in a letter, leaving but little for me to write.

This is my second visit to this place since the flood of 1907, at which time quite a number of persons were drowned, the mother of your valuable correspondent, Mr. Wilmore, being one of the number.

I discovered that many changes have been made since that memorable event. Quite a number of new buildings have been erected, and the business generally of the place has greatly increased.

There are three or four dry goods stores, a flouring mill, carding machine, all doing well. The cold weather, of course, has retarded business, but the merchants are looking forward to an increase of trade when spring opens.

Mr. C.H. Yates, who is said to be one of the best men who ever lived in this community, has been in declining health for some time, but when weather conditions are good he mingles with his friends, every body ready to give him a glad hand. His home has always been an asylum for friends who visited him, and the best viands the country affords is invariably spread before them. His excellent daughter, Mrs. Ella Robertson, is his housekeeper, and she is never happier than when she is doing everything in her power to make her father's guests feel at home. As I said in beginning this writing that Mr. Wilmore had sent in all the news, I will have to defer my write up of the town until I make another visit, at which time I hope the weather will be more favorable, affording an opportunity to see more people and more of the surroundings.

Wednesday, February 6, 1918

The weather was a little milder last week.

J.A. Wheeler and J.F. Gilpin, of Sparksville, were in our midst last Tuesday.

Our people are getting up plenty early this week, preparing for the next snow.

Garnett Dowell was at Greensburg the first of the week.

Mr. Luther Willis, one of our best farmers, was on the Greensburg loose leaf market a day or so last week.

Some of Mr. G.E. Nell's family are confined with measles this week.

W.G. Pickett, of Pickett, spent several days of last week, weighing up tobacco for Nell Bros., at this place.

P.H. Keltner, one of our best citizens, was confined to his room several days of last week with lagrippe.

Mr. Compton, of Louisville, the income tax man, spent two days with us last week. While here he had quite a number of citizens in to see him.

Mr. G.W. Dillon, one of Breeding's best business men, was in our midst one day last week. While here he called on the income tax man.

Mr. E.R. Baker, who has been in the grocery business for the past year or so, sold his stock of groceries to Wilmore & Moss, and has accepted a position with them for salesman in their general store for the ensuing year.

Mr. Sam Dudley and Thompson Baker of Farmingdale, Ill., who have been visiting their relatives here for the past month or so, started for their homes the first of the week.

Mr. T.W. Dowell sold last week, one-half interest in his roller mill, this place, to Mr. Leslie Dudley for $1,800. Mr. Dudley has taken charge of the mill and is starting off with a good business.

Strong Hill, one of the best known business men of our town made a business trip to Knob Lick one day last week. Mr. Hill says his trip was not a very successful one. It is very seldom that Mr. Hill ever loses out.

At the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Gradyville State Bank that met Feb. 1st, elected the following Directors for the ensuing year: U.N. Whitlock, George A. Keltner, J.R. Tutt, N.H. & C.O. Moss and W.M. Wilmore. J.A. Wheeler was made President and W.M. Wilmore for Vice President. The stockholders were all well pleased with the business of the institution for the past year. It has been a very successful year and they are all very thankful to the public for the liberal patronage

given the institution and are asking a continuation of the same.

Wednesday, February 13, 1918

Messrs. Edwards & Rodgers, tobacco men of Keltner, were in our midst last Friday.

James Gilpin and family, who have all been confined with measles, have about recovered.

We are glad to see the snow leaving us and the approach of the good old summer time.

C.C. Hindman, of Milltown section, was delivering some very fine corn here one day at $6.50 per lb.

Herschel Sherrill and family are now citizens of our town. There is not a vacant house in our city.

Deputy Sheriff Rowe, of Sparksville, was mixing with our people last week.

Misses Ruth and Elizabeth Rodgers are visiting their relatives and friends at Roachville, this week.

Ed Baker spent last Thursday in Columbia looking after a shipment of goods.

S.M. Baker bought a very fine span of mules in Green county last week, from Mr. Squires. Price paid $350.

Dr. L.C. Nell is preparing to prize [load into hogsheads] his crop of tobacco preparatory for the Louisville market.

Mr. G.W. Dudley sold his gasoline mill last week to Nell Bros. The mill will be moved to their farm in the near future. Consideration not learned.

Quite a number of fine sheep have died in this section during the past month or so.

Monday the fuel day is observed by all our merchants. It is not a very hard thing to do, when wood is as scarce as it has been during these cold winter months. [During the winter of 1917-1918, people were asked to observe "heatless Mondays" as a measure for conserving essential war materials.--ed.]

John . Alexander, the popular dry goods man of Louisville, was calling on his trade in our city last Friday, and as usual had a good business.

Robert L. Sneed sold his farm one day last week to Merida Wilson for $600 cash. Uncle Merida says he is going to try farming while tobacco is selling so high.

Robert Grady delivered, in Columbia, last week, his crop of Burley tobacco to Messrs. Faulkner & Co. This crop of tobacco is one of the best that was ever grown in this section of the county. Price he received for same was 25c per lb. Ask Mr. Faulkner and see if he will not testify to the same.

Messrs. Sherrill & Sparks, our new mill firm, will be ready for business in the near future. They expect to have a saw rig attached preparatory for cutting wood.

We are just in receipt of a letter from our old friend and neighbor, J.J. Hunter, formerly of our town, but of late of Amarilla, Texas, who is the agent for the Miami Mining Milling & Development Co., who is doing a great business for his company. We were certainly glad to hear from him and to know he was doing so well. Success to you, J.J.

We are just in receipt of the announcement of the marriage of Miss Emma Linna, the accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Virdie Thompson, formerly of this community, but now of Camner, Ky., on Friday, the 21st of December, 1917, to Corporal D.C. Biggs, of Augusta, Ga. May success attend them all through life is the wish of their many friends in our city.

Mr. and Mrs. Strong Hill, of our town, are just in receipt of a letter from their son, Ed, who is in Uncle Sam's service and at present is located at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., announcing that he had recovered from his recent operation, and that he had been promoted to Corporal. We are always glad to learn of our boys being promoted.

We will close by saying, all of our farmers are going to spread themselves this year for the banner tobacco. Some are cutting timber now preparatory for tobacco beds. 25cts per pound, tobacco will get a move on them certain.

Wednesday, February 27, 1918

We had another snow last week.

Herbert Holladay is in Louisville this week, taking the civil service examination.

J.T. Rose, of Sparksville, was in our midst last Thursday.

Dr. Jones, of Columbia, called in to see us, on his return from Weed last week.

(Long-running ad in the Adair County News, 1918, etc.):

L. H. Jones

Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist

Special attention given Diseases of all

Domestic Animals.

Office at Residence, 1 mile of town, on

Jamestown road.

Phone 114 G, Columbia, Ky.

Several of our boys left for Camp Taylor, last Friday, to enlist in Uncle Sam's business.

Strong Hill spent a day or so last week, at Mell, looking after his interest in that section.

Miss Ruth Holladay left us Friday for Bowling Green, where she will enter school.

William Coomer, while burning the rubbish off his meadow, last week, one day, burned up a very fine hay stack. Mr. Coomer says about four or five thousand pounds of good hay.

W.L. Grady was on the sick list a day or so last week.

U.N. Whitlock, of Bliss, was in our midst last Friday.

Wilby Rodgers, of Pickett, was in our town last Thursday looking after a work mule or two.

Zidney Willis, the successful merchant of Keltner, was shaking hands with his friends in our town last Wednesday.

Mr. W.E. Burris tried the Campbellsville tobacco market last week and the sale of his tobacco was very satisfactory.

Squire Charles Reece and his son, of Nell, passed through here with their crop of tobacco, en route for the Campbellsville loose leaf house.

Mr. T.W. Dowell, one of our successful businessmen as well as a splendid farmer, spent several days, in Green county, last week, prospecting.

Mr. W.C. Yates, of Campbellsville, was shaking hands with his many friends in our town last Friday.

Mr. N.P. Smith was on the sick list a day or so of last week.

The Agriculture man that was billed to lecture to our farmers, last week, failed to show up. We take it that he presumed we had first-class farmers in this part of the county and he would go where he was needed worse. If this be true his prediction was almost correct.

We are just in receipt of the announcement of the marriage of Miss Myrtie Butler, of Kennedy, Texas, to Mr. Garland Edwin Grady, of that city. Mr. Grady is a son of Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Grady, formerly of our town but late of McGregor, Tex. Young Mr. Grady is a nephew of Mr. W.L. Grady of our city.

The many friends of Mr. Grady, in our community, extend to him the right hand of congratulation.

Mr. John Rose, one of Uncle Sam's boys, who has been at Camp Taylor several months, came down Friday to spend a few days with his sister, Mrs. G.E. Nell, before starting to France. John is looking fine and enjoying the best of health.

T.W. Dowell sold his mill at this place with all the wheat he had in stock, to G.W. Dudley & Sons. The new firm have taken charge of the business and as they are good mill men the prospect is fine for a good business for them. Mr. Dowell in retiring from the milling business thanks the public for the liberal patronage given him and asks them to continue the same with the new firm. 

Wednesday, March 6, 1918

Mr. R.O. Keltner was in Columbia Thursday.

The baby of Mr. and Mrs. J.H Keen has been very sick for the past week.

Roy Walker & Son, of Nell, were in out midst last Saturday.

Born, to the wife of W.S. Baker, on the 25th, a son. Mother and child doing well. [The child was Lymon A. Baker; Mrs. Baker was the former Miss Rosa Bell.--ed.]

Austin Wilmore, of Kansas City, Mo., who has been visiting his parents at this place for the past month or so, returned last Friday.

Miss Mollie Flowers, who has been visiting at Louisville for a week or so, returned last week.

Messrs. Sparks & Sherrill have their new mill in operation and are making fine meal.

Our farmers put in several days of last week sowing oats and grass seed.

Joel Rodgers is spending a few days this week on his farm, in Roachville.

Mr. W.R. Lyons, the well-known groceryman of Campbellsville, was calling on his trade in our town last Thursday.

The new mill firm G.W. Dudley & Sons, of our town, are having a fine business, and giving perfect satisfaction in every particular.

John Holladay, the well-known school teacher of this county, was in our midst a few days of last week.

Fed Harper, Delbert Jones, and Jack Parson, of our town, left for the State of Illinois, a few days ago, where they will engage in business.

Quite a number of plant beds have been burned and sown in this community during the past month and if the plants come good there will be effort for the largest crops of tobacco ever grown in this section.

Mr. Brack Cain, one of our best business men as well as a good farmer, is on the market for a good saddle horse.

Mr. Luke Sherrill spent a few days of last week on Lemon's Bend, Taylor Co. He reports quite a lot of corn in that section spoiled.

Uncle Buck Cook, who has been on the sick list for quite a number of weeks, has about recovered and has taken up board with T.F. Gowen for the present.

Mrs. Carneo Finn, of Keltner, spent a  few days with her mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. P.H. Keltner, near our city, last week.

Rev. Bush, of Columbia, filled his regular appointment in our town last Saturday and Sunday.

Mrs. Luther Willis and her daughter spent a few days of last week visiting relatives at Keltner.

Messrs. Thompson Bros., of Park, spent a few days of last week in this section of country, looking after extra good mules. They bought a span of two year old mules from Lucian Yarberry, of Sparksville, for $400, and one from Porter England, of our community, for $170. Good mules will sell regardless of the price or color.

The baby of Mr. J.M. Sanders has been on the sick list for several days.

Wednesday, March 13, 1918

The weather has been delightful for the past week.

J.J. Parson, Strong Hill and Elbert Nell spent last week in Louisville.

Mr. Goodman, of Glasgow, the well-known dry goods man out of Nashville, made our town last week.

Will Ed Hunter sold, last week, to J.L. Walker, of Columbia, an extra good harness horse for $75.

Sam Jones and son (of color) sold a span of work mules, in Greensburg, one day last week, for $350.

Sherrill & Sparks sold, last week, to Zidney Willis, of Keltner, their grist mill. Mr. Willis has removed his mill to his town.

J.A. Wilmore and wife, of New York City, spent a few days with their relatives, in our city, last week.

The Quarterly meeting in our town last Saturday and Sunday was very well attended and an extra meeting with fine preaching.

The Sunday school will be reorganized at Union church, the 1st Sunday in April. Everybody in the community is invited to be present and take part.

Mose Wooten has recently purchased a Ford machine and is now making extra time. No trouble for him to get around over the community.

Joel Rodgers, of this place, sold his farm last week at Roachville, to Mr. Vance, of that section. This was a very valuable farm. A great deal of river bottom on the farm. The price received for it was nine thousand dollars cash. [The Hatcher community newsletter in the same edition stated the purchasers were J.M. and Knolton Vance; price paid $8,000.--ed.]

Dr. James Taylor, of Edmonton, passed through our town one day last week, en route for Columbia. Dr. Taylor informed us that everything was moving along nicely in his section of country and the farmers, as everywhere else, was preparing for a large crop of tobacco.

Our old friend, Clem Jones, of East Fork, called in to see us on his return from Columbia last week.

Clem looks as young as he did twenty years ago, when we were boys and attended church at old Bethel.

Mrs. R.O. Keltner celebrated the 80th anniversary of her husband last Sunday. While Uncle Robert has lived out his three score and ten years, the time allotted to all mankind, he is hale and hearty and bids fair to reach the 100 notch. He is fine company and makes us all feel pleasant when in his company. Quite a number of his relatives and friends were present to partake of the good things that had been prepared for the occasion. The day was very pleasantly spent and will be long remembered by everyone present. [Uncle Robert departed this vale of tears in mid-December, 1921, age 83 years, nine months and a few days.--ed.]

Strong Hill, while in Louisville, last week, bought a planing mill that he will install in his new building at this place. We are very glad that Mr. Hill made this deal as this is something we need bad in this section.

Wednesday, March 20, 1918

The growing crop of wheat is looking fine in this section.

Our farmers report that their tobacco plants are coming up nice.

Considerable plowing is going on in our community for the past week.

Rev. Joe Furkin, of Keltner, was in our midst last Friday.

Mr. Robert O. Keltner visited his brother, at Campbellsville, for a day or so last week.

Mrs. Maud Harper has been on the sick list for several days.

Dolphus Rogers, of Roachville, spent a day or so in our community the first of the week.

Curt Yarberry, of the Milltown section, was in out midst one day last week.

T.W. Dowell was looking after his affairs in Metcalfe county the first of the week.

Mrs. Smith, of Jamestown, sister of Mrs. S. Simmons, of our city, is visiting the latter this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Sherrod Hatcher, of the Columbia section, was in our midst one day last week.

Judge N.H. Moss spent one day, at Campbellsville, last week on business.

Brack Cain bought, last week, one hog from A.R. Keltner for $25.00.

Squire Akin, of Sparksville, was shaking hands with his many friends in our town one day last week.

Joel Rodgers is prospecting in Logan county, this week, with a view of buying land in that section.

Messrs. Mike and Frank Winfrey, of Columbia, in company with some oil men who have quite a number of acres of land leased in this part of Adair County, was through here the first of the week, looking over the situation.

Oil Excitement

(The Adair County News, April 17, 1918, page one)

In 1865 oil was found, but the field was not developed, on a farm now owned by Judge N.H. Moss, near Gradyville, Adair county.

A shallow hole was put down and plugged. Last Thursday while a plowman was at work on the farm he plowed over the plug and the oil commenced to flow.

Mr. G.R. Reed, of this place [Columbia], was present, talking to Judge Moss, when the oil commenced running.

He says it was of a bright amber color, and that the general opinion was that there is oil at that place in great abundance.

People became excited and prospectors are expected.

C.O. Moss sold his old family horse, last week, to Mr. Edwards, of Keltner.

Miss Ruth Hill, of our city, was presented with a doll, from her aunt of Campbellsville, that is over fifty years old, with a request that she keep it, and at the end of the next fifty years do likewise.

Dr. S. Simmons, in company with Mr Ollie Breeding and daughter, of Nell community, are in Louisville, this week. The daughter of Mr. Breeding has a defect in her hearing and while in the city the young lady will be treated for her deafness.

We are just in receipt of a communication from our old friend and neighbor, Geo. W. Robertson, of Elida, New Mexico. Mr. Robertson informed us that he expected to spend a number of months, this year, in the state of Arkansas, and also wanted to find out the address of Mr. James Turk, who

is located somewhere in Arkansas and for several years was a very worthy contributor to the Adair County News. The whereabouts of Mr. Turk, at this time, is not known to your reporter and if any of the News force knows his address, it would be a great accommodation to Robertson to let him know.

We will ring off by say we have been informed that J.F. Comptom, (better known as James Pat Compton), is working on an auto for Thos. Moss, and expects to have it completed during the year 1918. The name will be given later the kind of machine it will be.

Wednesday, March 27, 1918

Uncle Robert O. Keltner was on the sick list a few days of last week.

Rodgers & Darnell are prizing their purchase of tobacco this week. ["Prizing" referred to packing the tobacco into hogsheads.--ed.]

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.R. Baker was sick several days last week.

Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Bragg, of East Fork, visited the family of Mr. P.H. Keltner one day last week.

Mr. Joel Rodgers is winding up his affairs in this section preparatory for moving to Logan county, with a view of making that his future home.

Mrs. Sue Grissom, of Columbia, visited her daughter, Mrs. Wm. Wilmore, at this place, last week.

Mrs. Parson, a very old lady of our community, mother of George Parson, died with a complication of troubles on the 23rd. [Mrs. Seally Parson, ageg 66 years.--ed.]

Our farmers say their tobacco plants are all up and are looking fine, due to the warm sunshine and refreshing showers that we have had in the past week.

H.T. Sherrill made a business trip over in the Cane Valley section the first of the week.

Mr. Geo. Coffey, deputy Sheriff of Columbia, was calling on our citizens one or two days of last week, notifying them of the work of the recent board of supervisors.

Jimmie Coffey, of Columbia, passed through here last Friday, en route to Edmonton on business.

James K. Rodgers, of Keltner, was in our midst one day last week, looking after plow repairs. He reports a great deal of farm work going on in his community and prospects good for a bountiful wheat crop.

W.L. Grady received his new Ford machine last week,  and he is making good use of his time now running his machine and attending to his fine horses. By the way, we will say here that Mr. Grady has one of the finest young horses in Kentucky. If you don't believe it, just drop down in old Gradyville for a few minutes and be convinced fully.

Fine Stock

(The Adair County News, March 27, 1918, page one.)

W.L. Grady, of Gradyville, Ky., will make announcement in the News next week about his two fine stallions, King Peacock and Bohemian Leader. They are both great horses of the purple blood, Bohemian Leader coming from the great family to which belong the famous Richlieu King, Bourbon King, and Montgomery Chief.

 

Mr. Luther Willis has in his possession a small rocker, that is in perfect condition, this is over one hundred years old. This chair has been handed down from generation to generation.

Rev. B.T. Watson, of Columbia, will preach at the Methodist church in our city on the first Sunday in April. If you want to hear a good sermon come out and you will not be disappointed.

Archie Sullivan sold last week to Geo, W. Dudley and Son 20 hogs, averaging 125 lbs., at 16c per lb., bringing the sum of $400. Mr. Sullivan grew this bunch of hogs on acorns and beechnuts. Brack Cain, one of our live businessmen, sold ten head of young cattle, last week, at $26 per head. Also one or two horses at a fancy price. James Keen sold one work mule to Mr. Wilson for $175. Dr. S. Simmons sold a combined horse to Walter Morrison for $200. W.E. Hunter bought from W.M. Wilmore, a five year old combined horse, for $165. T.W. Dowell bought from Marcus Hood a very fine mare for $220. Ben Yarberry sold to Brack Cain a fine young mare for $200. This is just part of the trading that has been going on in this section this week.

Wednesday, April 3, 1918

Dr. T. Miller, of Columbia, was here the first of the week.

W.S. Baker and Geo. W. Dudley were in Columbia the first of the week.

T.W. Dowell spent a day or two at Camp Knox the first of the week.

J.M. Sanders sold his last year's crop of dark tobacco, about eight thousand pounds, at 13c per lb., at the barn.

Rev. Jo Furkins, of Keltner, motored to Campbellsville and Greensburg last Friday afternoon.

Frank Winfrey, deputy sheriff of Columbia, was through here several days last week collecting taxes.

Brack Cain and Curt Yarberry's residences will be connected with the outside world, by telephone, in a few days.

Curt Bell and Rufus Pulliam, of Red Lick and Nell, passed through here the first of the week, en route to Columbia, to consult with equalization board.

Mr. James Frisby and family, of Louisville, are spending a few days with their relatives and friends in the community at this time.

Uncle Robert O. Keltner has been very sick for the past week with heart trouble. It is hoped that his condition is better at this time.

Mrs. Maud Harper has been confined to her room for several days, from injuries received from a fall.

Our citizens put in several days of the warm sunshine, last week, in their gardens planting and preparing for planting.

Mr. and Mrs Luther Willis attended the funeral of some of their relatives, near Sulphur Well, last Thursday.

Willis Yarberry, of Breeding, spent a day or so last week in our town and community, looking after combined horses. Mr. Yarberry is a good judge of a horse.

L. Fielders and Charley Sparks were in Edmonton the first of the week. The former looking after timber, while the latter was on the market for a few good horses.

Mr. Tom Coffey, of East Fork, spent several days of last week, in Columbia, and on his return home called in to see us.

Mr. Miller, of Nashville, the agricultural man, was in our midst a day or two last week, calling on farmers. It was very interesting to hear him talk.

Quite a number of our colored boys left us last week to assist in Uncle Sam's business. We can say this for the boys that left here, they are good, straight honest boys and we take it that they will make good soldiers. They all seemed to be very patriotic and did not mind leaving.

Left for Camp Taylor

(The Adair County News, April 3, 1918, page one.)

The following Adair county colored men were sent by the local board of examiners to Camp Zachary Taylor last Saturday:

Walter Graves, Luther Jones, Jas. A. Harmon, Henry S. Jones, Geo. E. Fletcher, Alexander Jones, Jno. Dudley, Creed Vaughn, Jno. R. Smith, Rollin Frazier, Jas. Arthur Jones, Joe McCleary, Wm. Smith, Henry Griffin, Jr.

Mr. Sam Mitchell, ex-Sheriff of Adair called in to see us on his return from East Fork, last week, where he had been after seed corn, grown by our old friend and cohort, to-wit, Clem Jones, of that section. He presented your reporter with two or three of the finest ears of corn that we have seen for many years.

Dr. S. Simmons has bought of Joel Rodgers the farm known as the Henry Walker farm, for $3,000 cash. Mr. Rodgers will leave in a few days for Franklin, Ky., where he has purchased a very valuable farm for $30,000.

It is a boy at Ed Montgomery's. The young man arrived on the 28th of March. Mother and child doing well. [The child was William Montgomery; Mrs. Montgomery was the former Miss Maggie Moore.--ed.]

Wednesday, April 17, 1918

Miss Annie Kinnaird, of Red Lick, visited Miss Elva Hunter last Friday.

Miss Mollie Flowers is visiting at Greensburg this week.

Brack Cain and Strong Hill were at East Fork last Friday.

It looks very much like we will have a fine apple crop from the amount of bloom we have.

Uncle Robert O. Keltner has about recovered from his recent attack of heart trouble.

Col. J.N. Coffey, of Columbia, was called to do some surveying in this section last week.

Joel O. Rodgers and family left for their new home in Simpson county last week.

Dr. James Taylor and Clem Jones, of East Fork, passed through here the first of last week en route to Columbia.

G.T. Flowers, daughter and grandson visited in Campbellsville several days of last week.

Will Lyon, the popular groceryman, from Campbellsville, was calling on our merchants last Friday.

Mrs. Millie Hill, our milliner, is having a fine trade.

Ed Hill and Willie Corbin, two of our soldier boys, have notified their people that they have landed safe over seas, and both are well.

Somewhere in France

(Excerpted from an undated  letter published in the Nov. 6, 1918 Adair County News.)

Dear Father and Mother:

Well, just a few days ago we had quite an exciting time one morning about one o'clock. It seemed that every big gun over here began shooting and a little later we went over the top and run the Dutch back about 20 miles and believe me it made a fellow feel a little shaky at first when the big shell came whizzing by our heads, bursting close by and knocking us down every few steps, although I was awfully lucky; I did not get a scratch.

It was one of the biggest drives the U.S. boys had put up. You could see the dead Dutchmen most any place. It seemed as though they could not retreat fast enough.

Well, I could tell you lots more but I havn't time and paper at the present. Well, how are you getting along, fine I hope. Tell Ruth and everyone hello for me and that I would like to see them. Say, you find out Edgar s* address and send it to me, and also Garlin Dunbar and George H. Willis and all the other boys you can. I would be so glad to get in touch with any of them. Well, I will stop for now. With worlds of love to you all.

            Cpl. Ed L. Hill, Co. A., 7th U.S. Engineer, A.E.F.

Brack Cain bought in the East fork section 15 head of cattle at from $25 to $30 per head.

T.W. Dowell sold last week to Dr. James Taylor anywhere from eight to ten thousand pounds of Dark tobacco, weighed up at his barn, at 15 cents per pound. Mr. Dowell grew this tobacco on his farm at this place.

Our farmers are making the effort of their lives for a large crop of tobacco and corn. Quite a lot of ground has been turned for both crops. Some few are about done breaking, and we are glad to say that there was never a better prospect for a good wheat crop than at the present time, and if nothing happens to the tobacco plants, from all reports we gather, there will be enough to transplant all the ground our farmers are looking for. Some of them are now making read and are thinking of planting some corn soon. Grass is looking fine and we have nothing to discourage us except the war, and we trust that by early fall it will be a thing of the past.

Wednesday, April 24, 1918

We had a light snow this week.

Our farmers were very uneasy about their tobacco plants.

Strong Hill, J.J. Parson and Moses Wooten spent a day or so in Louisville the first of the week.

Mr. Horace Alexander, the popular groceryman of Burkesville, was calling on our merchants one day last week.

W.P. Flowers, of Columbia, is here this week looking after his affairs in our city.

W.C. Hill and wife visited relatives at Fairplay several days of last week.

J. Q. Alexander, well-known dry goods man of Louisville, was waiting on his trade in our city one day last week.

Dr. Simmons and family have moved to their farm. It will be only a short time until the doctor will have a desirable home.

Quite a number of our people attended the funeral of Chapman Moss. He was one of our best young men. His father, mother and devoted sisters have the sympathy of this community.

Sad Death

(The Adair County News, April 10, 1918.)

A message received here last Sunday, stated that Chapman Moss, son of Mr. Tom Moss, who lives below Gradyville, had just died, a victim of pneumonia. He was about 22 years old and enlisted in the service about five weeks ago. The remains reached this place last Monday night, and his old home Tuesday, where the interment and funeral took place...

Brack Cain bought several head of young cattle last week, from different parties, at prices from $25 to $40 dollars per head.

Geo. W. Dudley & Sons, our efficient mill men, are feeding a nice bunch of hogs preparatory for the June Market.

We take great pleasure in announcing in [the] News, that on the 30th day of May, Decoration Day, there will be an all day meeting at the cemetery, at Union. Dinner on the ground. In the forenoon will be used in clearing off the cemetery, which is very badly needed. In the afternoon we will have a sermon by Rev. B.T. Watson, suitable for the occasion, and after the sermon we expect to have speeches on the subject of good roads, which is also badly needed in this immediate community. Now we want everybody that have relatives and friends buried at the old Union graveyard to be represented or send means to assist in doing this work that is so badly needed. We would suggest that if you live in other States or counties and it is not convenient for you to be with us that you send a dollar or so to either Bank of Columbia, Ky., or to the postmasters at Columbia, Milltown, Bliss and Gradyville and we will guarantee that the money will be used for the purpose intended. We mean on that day to have the cemetery cleaned off. The condition it is in today is a disgrace to this community. Please remember the time and let everybody turn out and take part in this work that is so badly needed. Let us all remember the city of the dead where our loved ones sleep.

Wednesday, May 1, 1918

We had a good rain this week.

Several of our young men enlisted in the service of Uncle Sam last Friday.

Mrs. G.H. Nell, of Columbia, and Mr. Ernest Yates, McGregor, Texas, visited relatives here a few days last week.

Mrs. Smith, of Van Lear, Ky., and Mrs. Penick, of Geensburg, spent several days of last week visiting their parents, Judge N.H. Moss and wife, of this community.

Mrs. A.E. Walker, of Columbia, and her daughter, Mrs. Smith, of Van Lear, were visiting their relatives and friends in our city last week.

D.C. Wheeler is feeding a nice bunch of hogs preparatory for the Louisville market.

Mr. and Mrs. L.C. Willis started for Camp Taylor last Friday, where they will spend a few days with their son.

Mr. W.R. Lyon and wife, of Campbellsville, and Mrs. J. Cajer Yates, of Bradsfordsville, visited their uncle, Charlie Yates, and daughter, Miss Ella, last week.

J.J. Parson bought, last week, from G.E. Nell, a house and lot in our town, for the consideration of $650. We are glad Mr. Parson has decided to locate permanently with us. he is one of the best blacksmiths in the State. Nothing too complicated for him to do.

E.R. Baker, the efficient salesman of Wilmore & Moss, was on the sick list a few days last week.

Dr. L. Nell will leave in a few days for Louisville, where he will sell quite a lot of tobacco.

Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Hill and son, of Adairville, visited their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Strong Hill several days last week.

Miss Mattie L. Moss, of Greensburg, spent a few days here last week, visiting her uncle, Mr. C.O. Moss.

Miss Mollie Flowers is spending this week in Columbia and Greensburg.

Dr. Jas. Taylor, of East Fork, and Mr. M. Coomer, of Basil, spent a day or so last week, weighing their Dark tobacco recently purchased from T.W. Dowell, of our town.

Mrs. Will Diddle, of Adairville, visited at the home of Mr. Strong Hill several days last week.

(Untitled wedding announcement)

(The Adair County News, January 9, 1918.)

Miss Alva Knight, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Knight of Jamestown, and Mr. Will Diddle, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Diddle of Adairville, Logan Co., were married Dec. 26th in Russell Springs by Rev. Oscar Capshaw. The groom is a native of Gradyville and both were students at Lindsey Wilson College.

T.W. Dowell and J.M. Sanders have the finest mule colts of this section.

Robert Grady sold, last week, to R.L. Caldwell, a bunch of nice hogs at 16 cts per lb. W.L. Grady sold two fine Jacks last week. Brack Cain is dealing extensively in fine brood sows. At the present time he has 10 or 15 on hand. He is preparing for a large crop of corn and expects a good mast, and if nothing happens he will have the hogs to devour both. Some of our farmers are through planting corn and the others are just about ready to begin. We are glad to note that there is an unusual large crop of corn planted and to be planted this season. Never was there in the history of this country such an effort put forth by the farming class of people as there is right now at this particular time in this community. The tobacco plants are in abundance and will be ready for transplanting in just in a few days. The wheat and grass crop never did look better. If Mr. G.H. Nell, of your town, could just drop down and take a bird's eye view of the farm he sold B.B. Janes and see the large fertile bottoms of Clover and other grass almost ready to harvest in the early spring, he would just imagine he was in the Blue Grass region of old Kentucky.

Remember on the 30th of May the cemetery at Union will be cleaned off. Dinner on the ground.

Wednesday, May 8, 1918

We had frost this week. But little damage done.

Dr. L.C. Nell and son are in Louisville this week.

Mr. Robert O. Keltner was in Columbia last Thursday.

James Gilpin and wife and Cajer Coomer, of Sparksville, were in our midst last Friday.

J.A. Diddle, of Adairville, was looking after his affairs in this section a day or so of last week.

Chapman Browning, of Milltown, was looking at W.L. Grady's fine stock one day last week.

Strong Hill is daily driving nails on his new business house in our town.

J.N. Coffey, Robert Young, H.A. and J.L. Walker, of Columbia, were surveying some land in this section, one day last week, that was conveyed to the Cole Bros., from the heirs of J.D. Walker, deceased.

Rev. Bush, of Columbia, preached a very interesting discourse at the Baptist church in our city last Sunday afternoon.

Strong Hill, H.K. Alexander, and Oscar Farr, all commercial salesmen out of Louisville, were calling on our merchants last week.

We were all made sad when we learned of the death of our friend and neighbor, Harlan Hindman. He was a young man that was reared in our community, and one that everybody liked. If he had an enemy we never knew it. A model young man. His father, sister and brothers have the sympathy of this community.

Harlan Hindman

(Excerpted from a lengthy obituary in the Adair County News, May 8, 1918.)

Harlan Hindman was a son of W.A. Hindman and a nephew of the late Lieutenant Governor, J.R. Hindman, and was a young man of many noble traits of character, and his friends were numerous... He was born and reared near Milltown, this county...

Messrs. James Goff and F. Richardson, of Columbia, called in to see us, while en route for Nell, one day last week. They informed us that their machinery was daily running in the pursuit of oil. We hope they will be successful and in the near future strike a gusher and there will be a great oil field where they are operating.

Mr. Wilkerson, of Glensfork section, spent several days here, last week, securing oil leases for the Ohio Producing & Refining Co., of Buffalo, N.Y. He secured several thousand acres of land on this creek. Mr. Wilkerson informed us that it would only be a short time until his company would be in here operating. Also the Southern Oil Refining Co., of Colorado, had representatives here that spent several days looking over the situation and securing oil leases. They also secured a number of acres. The oil well on Judge Moss' farm, that was drilled during the year 1865, is producing quite a lot of oil every day. Indications goes to prove that we are certainly in the midst of an oil field. While in conversation with Uncle Charlie Yates, who knows more about the situation of oil here says: to the best of my knowledge, the well that is producing oil on Judge Moss' farm was not drilled very deep. The land at that time belonged to his brother, C.C. Yates. We take it, that the right thing to do, is for the companies that want to locate the oil fields, is to come right down on this creek and go to work where they know the oil is, for it is here now to be inspected by any one who wants to see it. The thing to do is to go down deep enough to get the oil.

Wednesday, May 22, 1918

J.K. Rodgers, of Keltner, was in our midst Friday, and reports everything moving along nicely and the farmers planting corn and preparing tobacco ground.

Dr. and Mrs. L.C. Nell returned from Louisville last week where they have been for the past two weeks with their son, L.C., Jr., who has been under treatment by a specialist for his eyes.

W.L. Grady shipped one of his fine Jennets, to a noted stockman of Raleigh, Miss., which he sold at a fancy price.

Mr. A. Hunn, of Columbia, spent a day or two in our midst last week, securing oil leases. He has quite a lot of land leased in this section.

Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Parson attended the funeral of their little niece, near Summershade church last Friday.

Dudley & Sons, our efficient mill men, have recently repaired their saw mill, that is attached to their flouring mill, and now prepared to do good sawing.

Mr. Clem Jones, of East Fork, passed through here last Tuesday, on his return from Columbia, where he had purchased some fine horses. Mr. Jones is a good Judge of horses and knows one when he comes in contact with it.

Our trader, L.B. Cain, who is always ready for a deal, sold a fine horse to Charlie Sparks last week for a fancy price. Also bought several head of fine cattle. We have not been able to get the prices, but we are certain that he paid the market price.

Mr. J.G. Rodgers, who left for his farm which he bought near Franklin, a few weeks ago, was in our midst for a few hours last week. He reports that he is well pleased with his farm, and that his family is enjoying the best of health and are highly pleased with the community in which they reside.

W.L. Grady and wife, in company with Mrs. Sophia Ervin, of Louisville, visited the family, of R.L. Caldwell, of Milltown, last Sunday.

We regret that during the hours of service, while Rev. B.T. Watson was preaching to a large audience, in our city, last Saturday night, that some thieves went from house to house taking everything most that they came in contact with. This matter should be looked into by the grand jurors, and the guilty one punished to the extent of the law.

We are just in receipt of a communication from my kinsman and friend, L.M. Wilmore. of Bogard, Mo., with a check for $1.00, for the proceeds of same to go toward cleaning off the cemetery at Union. We are glad to know that the cemetery is a sacred spot in his memory, while he is many miles from us he has not forgotten where his loved ones sleepeth. The work will be accomplished on the 30th of May, without a doubt. Everyone is invited to attend.

Wednesday, May 29, 1918

We had plenty of rain this week.

A great deal of complaint of corn coming up bad in this section.

Quite a number of our people attended the speaking at Columbia last Thursday.

Mr. and Mrs. Arvest Hill and son, of Adairville, spent a few days with their father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Strong Hill, of our city last week.

Deputy Sheriff McClister was looking after some of our boys the first of the week.

W.B. Hill, Pratt's salesmen, was at home a few days the first of the week.

Dr. and Mrs. L.C. Nell made a trip to Louisville the first of the week.

Miss Ruth Hill is visiting her relatives at Adairville this week.

Luke Sherrill made a business trip to Greensburg last Friday and Saturday.

Mrs. D.C. Wheeler sold, last week, to James Burris, one hundred dollars worth of Hens and has a good supply left on her hands.

John Wes Sparks made a business trip to Edmonton last Tuesday. He reports the roads in a very bad condition.

Mrs. James Tinsley and children, of Louisville, who have bene visiting here for the past month, returned home the first of the week.

We are glad to note that Rev. L. Vance and family are now citizens of our town, as he is our preacher in charge. He will be closer to his work.

Mrs. Thad Salmon started for Bogard, Mo., Tuesday, where she will spend several days visiting her sister, Mrs. L.M. Wilmore.

G.H. Willis, one of our soldier boys, who is at home on a short furlough, called in to see us a day or so ago. He is looking fine and enjoys the soldier's life very much.

Mr. George Cheatham, of Milltown, was in our midst one day last week, and bought a carload of hogs in this community at 1 cents of the Louisville market when received. The hogs will go on or before the first of June.

Mr. T.W. Dowell returned from Louisville the first of the week, where he had spent several days on the tobacco market, selling his purchase of tobacco and what he had raised on his farm. Mr. Dowell was highly pleased with his sales, averaging about 37 cents.

During the recent rains in this section, quite a number of our farmers to get all of their crop of tobacco set in this part of the county. [There apparently is one or more missing words in the original newspaper entry.--ed.] While the majority of our corn come up bad, it has been replanted and will be up in a few days. Our wheat and meadow grass never looked better and bids fair to make a bountiful yield.

One of the largest sales made from poultry since February  the 1st, is reported by  Mrs. O.W. Breeding, from the White Leghorn family of chickens. She sold from one hundred hens three hundred  and seventy-eight dozen of eggs that brought her $100, and set forty dozen eggs and sold 80 hens that brought her $54.45.

Mrs. Julia Baker will leave in a few days for Liletown, where she will spend the heated months with her daughter, Mrs. Mills. She handed us a dollar to be used in helping clean off the cemetery at Union on the 30th, and regretted very much that it was impossible for her to be present on the occasion, but had not forgotten the importance of having the work done. Remember the time and place. Everybody come.

On the first Sunday in June, there will be special services at Union church for the benefit of the young people and children. Every young lady and gentleman and all children should be present. You can not afford to miss this service. The sermon will be preached by Rev. B.T. Watson. Everybody invited to attend.

Wednesday, June 5, 1918

We are having the warmest weather of the season this week.

Miss Annie Kinnaird, of Red Lick, visited relatives here a few days of last week. 

Mrs. W.L. Grady received considerable shock from a fall one day last week.

Charlie Sparks spent last Monday in Edmonton and made a horse trade or two while on the route.

Durham & Cheatham, of Campbellsville and Milltown, left with our people last Wednesday, twenty-five hundred dollars for hogs.

Strong Hill had a good work horse to get his leg broken  from a  kick from another horse one day last week.

Uncle Robert O. Keltner continues in a very critical condition, His son from Oklahoma is at his bedside, and will remain until there is a change.

John Pickett, of Campbellsville, was in our midst a day or so last week, looking after life insurance. John is the right man in the right place.

Mr. W.C. Yates and wife, of Campbellsville, Burton Yates, of Joppa, Ernest Yates, of McGregor, Texas, Mrs. G.H. Nell, of Columbia, and Mrs. Polly Gulpton [should be Gupton?] and daughter, of East Fork, in company with Uncle Charlie Yates and daughter, of our city, spent a few hours, last Friday, at the Yates cemetery.

James Goff, T. Morgan, A. Hunn and Mr. Bennett, of Columbia, were in our community, last Friday, looking after their oil and stock interest in this section.

[The following, as originally published in the newspaper, was one long paragraph.--ed.]

The citizens of our community gathered on the 30th of May, at the Union cemetery, and put in a few hours of hard work, and we are glad to say, by the noon hour it was cleared off. We feel safe in saying that if the Lord will forgive us for letting the last resting place of our loved ones get in such a condition, we never again will let it get that way again.

After the work was completed, a bountiful repast was spread by the good ladies of the community and after the dinner hour, our pastor, Rev. B.T. Watson, preached a very interesting sermon, which was very appropriate for the occasion. After the sermon, Hon. H.C. Baker was called for and made a very able speech on the subject of good roads and demonstrated to our people very clearly how we had neglected this great subject and showed very plainly that in some sections of our county that there had not been much improvement since the existence of our county and fully showed that where the establishment of good roads was in effect that the county improved in the same proportion as the roads.

His speech was gladly received by everyone present. Before our people left the ground some of our best farmers and citizens got together and had a committee appointed and this committee will act at once. There is a spirit prevailing within our peoples to push this subject of good roads to a finish and we are glad to say that they will turn their money loose at this age of the day for the better of the roads.

The day was very pleasantly spent.

At Union

(Adair County News, June 5, 1918, page one.)

The Memorial Day service was a great success at Union Cemetery last Thursday. A large company of men did actual "service" in cleaning off and beautifying the grounds on the morning--while numbers of people from all sections were gathering and the ladies spread dinner.

After dinner a memorial sermon was preached by Rev. B.T. Watson, on "Immortality."

Judge H.C. baker was called upon and made a telling address on the "Gospel of Good Roads."Much interest is being awakened in the community and immediate steps are going to be taken to make a good road from Gradyville to Columbia...

The graves of the cemetery were decorated with flowers and everybody felt the day has been well spent.

Wednesday, June 12, 1918

We are having plenty of rain this week.

Dr. L.C. Nell, wife and son were in Louisville the first of the week.

Strong Hill sold to Bennett & Co., of Columbia, 5 cattle for $207.20, last Thursday.

James A. Wilmore, of Lexington, came down last Wednesday, and spent one night with his father and mother before leaving for Uncle Sam's service.

U.N. Whitlock, of Bliss, in company with his brother, of Indianapolis, Ind., was in our midst last Thursday.

Twenty of our young men, from this part of the county, registered in Columbia on the 5th.

Miss Annie Kinnaird, after a few days visit with her relatives and friends in our city, returned to her home at Red Lick. She was accompanied by Miss Mollie Flowers.

Rev. Wrentmore, of Indiana, State Evangelist of the Christian church, gave a very interesting lecture

to a large audience in our town last Saturday night, on the subject of the present war.

Mr. A.C. Coomer, who lives on Leatherwood creek, informed us that from the 15th of February they had sold from 65 hens $103.60 worth of eggs, besides what they had set. Also sold 15 of their hens that brought them $15.20, one day last week. Mr. Coomer has the brown Leghorn stock of chickens.

Rev. L.D. Vance left last Saturday for District Conference at Albany.

Uncle Charlie Yates passed his eightieth anniversary last Friday. He is hale and hearty and we trust that he will be permitted to remain with us for a number of years yet. [The writers' wish was granted. Mr. Yates lived seven more years, less a few weeks; he died on the last day of April, 1925.--ed.] Rev. E.W. Coakley of Waynesburg, Ky., is spending a few days with him. Bro. Coakley is well and is looking fine. We were all glad to see him. He will preach for us Friday afternoon and also Sunday afternoon. We know from past experience that his sermons will be very interesting and helpful.

Mr. Hodges, Swan Abram Hat man, of Louisville, was calling on our merchants last Friday and as usual had a good business.

This week rounded up the larger part of setting tobacco in this section. We are glad to note that there has been a large acreage set. Some few did not have plants enough to get all their ground set that they intended, but by the next season they will all get through. Our growing of corn is looking fine and an extra crop of wheat about ready to harvest. Peas, beans and potatoes are just now coming in to be served. We will all have plenty and some to spare, and we are willing and ready to divide this with those who have none.

Wednesday, June 19, 1918

J.T. Mercer, of Milltown, was here the first of the week.

Miss Mollie Flowers and sister, Mrs. Moss, visited relatives in the Milltown community last Wednesday.

Dr. X.W. Scott, of Breeding section, was looking after oil leases in this vicinity as day or so of last week.

Mr. H.K. Alexander, the well-known grocery man of Louisville, was in our midst the first of the week.

Charlie Reece, of Nell, was here last Friday looking after produce.

James Burris bought through here one day last week quite a lot of wool at 65c per lb.

H.A. Walker, of Columbia, was through here last week, looking after cattle and sheep.

T.W. Dowell was on the sick list a few days last week from a head trouble.

Uncle O. Keltner, who has been on the sick list for several weeks, is again out on the stage of action.

James Goff, Columbia, was looking after his oil interest in this section a day or so of last week.

Jo Hunter was in Columbia a day or so last week, on business.

Rev. D.L. Vance and Amos Keltner attended Quarterly meeting at Breeding last Monday.

George Coffey, Deputy sheriff of Columbia, spent a day or so here the first part of the week, preparing for circuit court.

The largest attendance at church we have had in our town for some time, was on last Sunday afternoon, to hear Rev. E.W. Coakley, formerly pastor of the Baptist church here thirty years ago, who is now the pastor at Waynesburg, Ky. Notwithstanding the severe warm weather he had the profoundest attention and his discourse was very interesting.

Our farmers are putting in this week harvesting their wheat, and we are very sorry indeed to report that we hear a great deal of complaint about the crop in the last few days being damaged very much by rust. Some few say that their wheat is considerably damaged and is very much straw fallen, while others say theirs is not hurt so bad. However, we take it that there will be an abundance made to bread our people and some to spare. We have also heard that in some section of the community that the last setting of tobacco is frenching very bad and some few are plowing their crop up and planting corn instead. If this be the case putting in corn is a wise conclusion.

My old friend, G.W. Dudley informed me that he thought a tan yard would pay well in this section for the next year or so. Since the dog law is being investigated by our grand jurors and leather is so high, we certainly agree with Mr. Dudley. This will of cause more dogs to go out of existence between this and the first of September than anything else could be brought about. [This entry transcribed exactly as it appeared in the newspaper.--ed.]

The New Dog Law

(The Adair County News, June 19, 1918, page one.)

The recent session of the Kentucky Legislature enacted into law an act relating to dogs, requiring them to be listed with the Assessor at the time of assessing property as required by law, providing for license and tags for each and every dog to be issued by the County Clerks...and for failure to list each dog...a penalty of not exceeding $100 or imprisonment of not exceeding three months, or both...is prescribed.

Wednesday, June 26, 1918

We had a nice rain to-day and vegetation has put on a different appearance.

The warmest weather of the season was last week.

John Pickett, the well-known insurance man of Campbellsville, was in our midst last Thursday and Friday.

James Goff and Robert Wethington of Columbia, spent last Thursday and Friday, in our town, looking after the oil fields and machinery.

G.E. Nell, J.J. Parson, and Ed Montgomery motored to Lebanon Wednesday afternoon.

Uncle Robert O. Keltner continues to improve. It is hoped by his many friends that he will soon be restored to his wanted health.

Richard Rupe and family are visiting in Louisville this week.

Rev. B.T. Watson, of Columbia, filled his regular appointment at Union, last Sunday morning, and in the afternoon preached at Gradyville. Both discourses were very interesting.

Dr. S. Simmons and family visited relatives and friends at Jamestown last Sunday.

Several from this place attended the funeral of Hogard Campbell, last Monday, in the Sparksville community.

Hogard Campbell

(The Adair County News, June 19, 1918, page one.)

Hogard Campbell, son of Joseph Campbell, who lived near Dirigo, died Sunday night, of leakage of the heart. He had been a student at the Lindsey-Wilson Training School for the last three years... He was 21 years old having registered on the 5th of this month for army service.

Our farmers were exceedingly glad to have the good rain that enabled them to replant all of their growing crop of tobacco. We are glad to note that the crop of young weed is looking fine in this part of the county.

Some one entered the rolling mill at this place and did not do anything, except relieve the mill of about 200 pounds of the very best quality flour.

Mr. and Mrs. Evan Akin, of near Sparksville, entertained some of their friends last Saturday afternoon. The music was furnished by the Akin band, assisted by A.B. Henderson and L.C. Hill, of our city.

Those present said the music could not be excelled and the evening was delightfully spent.

Mr. James G. Flowers, the well-known hardware man, of St. Louis, Mo., is spending a few days with his relatives in our city. Mr. Flowers is looking fine and we were all glad to see him.

There will be erected near this place, during the fall season two school buildings. We understand that Messrs. Henderson & Rowe have the contract for building these houses. Both are men of experience along this line and we take it when they are ready to turn the keys over, the patrons will be pleased.

Wednesday, July 3, 1918

We had a fine rain to-day.

Several of our farmers have laid their corn by.

Dr. S. Simmons delivered a bunch of hogs to R.L. Caldwell, at Milltown, the first of the week.

Rev. Bush, of Columbia, filled his regular appointment here last Saturday and Sunday.

About all the wheat is stacked in this section and a very good crop on hands.

Miss Ruth Hill, who has been visiting at Adairville for the past month, returned home last Thursday.

Deputy Sheriff Geo. Coffey, of Columbia, put in several days, in this section, last week.

John Pickett, of Campbellsville, was looking after insurance here several days of last week.

Quite a lot of hay was saved in this community last week.

Mr. B.B. Janes has just completed saving a large clover field which is some of the finest hay we have seen for several years.

Miss Evelyn Simmons, of Columbia, is the guest of Miss Gertrude Keltner this week.

Rev. Vance and family are visiting their relatives at Hodgenville this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Arvest Hill and son, of Adairville, are with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Strong Hill, of our city, for a few days.

Mr. O.M. Barbee, of Columbia, who has been visiting relatives at Edmonton for several weeks, passed through here last week en route for home.

Mr. G.T. Flowers and daughter, Miss Mollie, accompanied by Mrs. C.O. Moss and her two sons, James and Harold, and her brother, James G. Flowers, of St. Louis, Mo., visited their brother, George Flowers, and family at Monticello several days of last week.

Our citizens showed their patriotic duty last Friday afternoon, when they purchased in this part of Adair county, over two thousand dollars worth of War Savings stamps. Nearly every citizen in this section responded to the call at once.

Wednesday, July 10, 1918

We are needing rain.

J.A. Hill, wife and son returned to their home, at Adairville, the first of the week.

Milton Grissom, of Columbia, spent several days of last week, with relatives here.

Luther G. Sneed was arrested here, last week, by Sheriff [Cortez] Sanders and his deputy, Wilson, and lodged in Columbia jail.

The school at this place opened the second Monday. Miss Butler will be our teacher. she comes well recommended as a teacher.

C.O. Moss and family spent last Sunday in Columbia.

Rev. D.L. Vance is making a great improvement of the appearance, as well as the convenience of the parsonage, in out city, by erecting a nice porch in front of the dwelling.

Mr. T.W. Dowell was at Campbellsville, last Monday, on business.

Protracted services will begin at Union on the 3rd Sunday in August, conducted by the pastor, Rev. B.T. Watson. Everybody has a special invitation to attend these services.

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Sparks, in company with Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Nell, spent the 4th of July at Edmonton.

Mr. and Mrs. W.L. Grady will leave in a few days for a protracted visit in the Lone Star State, and will visit other places while gone.

Strong Hill was looking after his business affairs at Keltner and Portland last Saturday.

Quite a number of our citizens were summoned to appear before the grand jury last week. We are glad that the young men and little boys that have been using their artillery so freely down this way are being looked after. it was getting so that it was dangerous to be on the public highway after the curtains of darkness were drawn around.

Lamore Simmons, of Russell county, spent a few days here last week, visiting his brother, Dr. S. Simmons. Mr. Simmons reports fine prospects for a bountiful corn crop. But little tobacco was transplanted in his part of the county.

The sugar and flour problem is beginning to be a serious proposition in this part of old Adair. If we had plenty of sorghum we could get along fine for the sweets. Scarce of both makes it a little difficulty.

Mr. J.P. Conover, of Montpelier, who has been visiting his daughter, Mrs. N.H. Moss, for the past week or so, called in to see us on his return home last week. Mr. Conover is looking fine and gets around remarkably well for a man his age. [This most likely was Mr. James K.P. Conover. If so, he would have been in his early 70s.--ed.]

The craft of Gradyville Lodge, No. 25 of F. & A.M., have a special invitation for every member to be present at its next regular communication. At night, work, as well as other important business to look after.

Wednesday, July 24, 1918

We have had a few days of very cool weather.

Several of our young men enlisted in Uncle Sam's affairs last Sunday.

Misses Miller and Coffey, of Columbia, visited Miss Christine Nell, of our city, several days last week.

W.L. Grady and wife left for McGregor, Texas, last Thursday... [for] a month or so.

A..B. Henderson, & Co., have begun work on their new school building near this place.

Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Parson visited relatives at Fry a day or so of last week.

W.B. Hill, Pratt's salesman, is at home for a short time, preparing for his fall trips.

Our farmers are all ready to have their wheat threshed, only waiting for one to come into the community. There is an average crop in this section.

John H. Holladay, a well-known school teacher in this part of the county, was in our midst one day last week and informed us that he was going to locate in Columbia, going to housekeeping him and his youngest daughter, in a few days.

Hay harvest is on in this section this week. Quite a lot of extra good hay. T.W. Dowell, B.B. Janes and D.C. Wheeler have a fine lot of extra good hay with a number of others in this community.

Miss Elsie Nelson, of Greensburg, visited her mother, Mrs. Liny Nelson, near this place, several days last week.

W.P. Flowers, of Columbia, spent a few days of last week here looking after his growing crops and other affairs.

W.L. Fletcher sold Brack Cain a very valuable young mare and one yearling calf for $225. Mr. Fletcher is now on the market for a good young mare.

Quite a number of cases of whooping cough in this and adjoining communities. Some very few of the cases have been very bad but none fatal.

A good citizen gone. Mr. Jefferson Rose, aged 72 years, had been a sufferer for a number of years, with a complication of diseases. The end came on the evening of the 11th. He leaves a wife and daughter with a host of friends and relatives to weep over his departure. His remains were interred in the family cemetery, near where he lived.

We have had fine rains this week.

The growing crop of tobacco, in this section, is not doing so well.

Charlie Sparks has been on the sick list for the past week.

Messrs. Cheatham & Durham, Campbellsville, received lambs here the first of the week, at prices from 15c to 16c per pound.

We take it that the merchants at Bakerton have the best trade on Pratt's Stock food of any merchants in this part of the State. Their man, W.B. Hill, visits his trade as regular as the weeks come on Saturday afternoon and remains over until Tuesday or Wednesday.

Mr. John Pickett, the well-known insurance man of Campbellsville spent a few days of the first of the week in midst, and did a fine business. John certainly is the right man in the right place.

Messrs. J.J. Parson, Strong Hill, Gilbert Parson, W.B. Hill and Moses Wooten motored to Louisville last Friday.

Judge N.H. Moss spent several day of last week in Louisville with his relatives and friends.

Thos. Stults and A.W. Tarter spent last Friday in our city, looking after insurance and other affairs.

Dr. and Mrs. James Taylor, of Edmonton, called in to see us on their return from Columbia the first of the week. The doctor informed us that they would soon be permanently located in Edmonton.

There came out in the Hart County Herald of July 4 edition, an exceptionally fine address delivered by Mrs. J.B. Yates, of Cave City, at the Decoration [Day] exercises: subject, World War, Woman, Relation to the soldier of today. A copy of the paper was sent to their uncle, Charlie Yates, of our city, and I had the pleasure of reading same. We don't see where there could have been any improvement made on the subject in anyway. We wish the piece could be read by every soldier boy's

mother.

C.C. Hindman and S.A. Hatcher, of Milltown section, were shaking hands with their many friends in our town last Friday.

Wednesday, July 31, 1918

J.R. Howard, of Greensburg, was in our midst last Friday.

Mr. and Mrs. S.A. Hatcher, of Columbia, visited here last Friday.

Dudley & sons are receiving a considerable amount of new wheat this week at $2.00 per bu.

W.E. Hunter sold two yearling mules, last week, to Ed C. Sneed & Bro., for $200.00.

Frank Toliver, of Lebanon, Tenn., and H.A. Walker, of Columbia, were here buying mules last week, paying from $110 to $175 per head.

Mrs. C.O. Moss and Miss Mollie Flowers visited in Columbia a day or so last week.

Judge Sinclair and A.W. Tarter, of Columbia, were calling on their friends in our midst last Friday.

George Coffey, deputy sheriff, was looking after the boys in this section a day or so last week.

Strong Hill, Will Lyon, Jo Goodman, with several other commercial men were calling on our merchants last week.

Rev. J.E. Scott is holding a series of meetings at Big creek church this week. There is great interest manifested and several professions.

Strong Hill has made his fall visit to Louisville, and he informed us that the character of goods that he usually purchases was so much higher than common, on account of the world war, that he bought something like a carload of stock food of the very best quality.

We have been wonderfully blessed with rains through this section this season. There has not been a time that we have suffered for rain. Notwithstanding the good rains we have had our growing crop of tobacco, [is] not showing up as well as it ought to. A great deal of the weed was we call it has frenched and it is not regular on the growth. Some large and some small in the same fields. We cannot account for it, as the ground is about all the same quality of land. Our corn crop is looking fine and if it keeps seasonable the next month as it has for the past two months, we will have a bountiful yield.

Mr. Clay Kinnaird, of Red Lick, was in our midst one day last week, and informed us that on Leatherwood creek, just above where he lives, that the hail storm that passed through that section, last week, did a great deal of damage to the growing crops of tobacco. Some of the early crops were badly damaged, and he feared that it will not grow out to be any good.

Dr. S. Simmons is making  great improvements on his farm, that he recently purchased at this place by putting up new fences and repairing the old ones and building new outbuildings.

We have been informed that Ollie Breeding, who lives on the headwaters of Leatherwood creek, made one of the largest crops of hay that was ever grown in this section. it is said that Mr. Breeding's crop of hay was like Carter's oats, did not have room to stack it in the field where it grew. He gave Melvin Compton, one of his neighbors, three-fourth of his crop, and his neighbors say, he has plenty left for his own use and some to spare.

The protracted service will begin at Union the 3rd Sunday in August, conducted by the pastor. Remember the singing every Sunday afternoon until the protracted services begin. Every member of the class will please attend these singings, and have the music ready for the services.

Wednesday, August 14, 1918

The hottest weather of the season this week.

Mr. Sam Hill, of East Fork, spent a day or so of last week with his relatives here.

We are needing rain very bad in this section at this time.

Rev. D. Vance returned from Louisville the first of the week.

Charles Sparks has been on the sick list for the past week or so.

Mrs. Elizabeth Grissom and her daughter, Miss Mary, of Columbia, spent a day or so of last week visiting relatives in our city.

Brack Cain sold to Phelps Bros., of Columbia, last week, $350 worth of cattle and also bought from Albert Brummett 7 head of cattle at $30 per head.

W.B. Hill, Pratt's food man, has been on the sick list for the past few days. Not able to be on the stage of action.

The old soldier's re-union at Weed, last Wednesday and Thursday was largely attended. Good preaching and general good time prevailed.

(Two untitled entries)

(The Adair County News, July 31, 1918.)

Remember and attend the meeting of the old soldiers at Weed the 7th and 8th of August. An all round handshaking and good speeches, plenty to eat.

***d***

(The Adair County News, August 14, 1918.)

At the old soldier's picnic at Weed, last week, Nell & Son, of this place [Columbia], sold 195 cases of dope, and L.M. Young sold 85 gallons of ice cream. The weather was exceeding hot and the demand for cold drinks was unusually large.

Mr. Sam Mitchell, of Columbia, on his return from East Fork, last Friday, where he had been visiting his old friend, Clem Jones, informed us beyond a doubt that Mr. Jones had the finest growing crop of tobacco in Adair or Metcalfe counties. It was simply all fine and just beginning to get ripe.

Atty. General James Garnett, of Louisville, and Robert Reed, of Columbia, enjoyed the hospitality of Uncle Charlie Yates and his daughter, Mrs. Robertson, of our city, last Tuesday.

Dr. Samuel Taylor and family, of Montpelier, passed through our city, the first of the week, en route for Nell, where they will spend a few days visiting relatives.

Our farmers are about all through threshing their wheat and we have made a fairly good crop, enough to bread our people anyway. Corn and tobacco crops are looking fairly well and bids fair to make a good half crop anyway. At the present time we are needing rain very bad. We have been very seasonable right through this section, have not suffered for rain until present, during the season.

W.L. Grady and wife returned from McGregor, Texas, the first of the week. They report all of the Kentucky people getting along fine and had everything in the way of this world's goods and make life happy. The only thing Mr. Grady noticed in any way discouraging was the continuous drouth that they were going through, but the good things they gave him to eat while there, made him forget the drouth, and it was a delightful visit for him and wife and will be long remembered.

Mr. Albert Brummett sold his farm last week, to Pod Wheeler for $2,500. This farm is known in this section of county as John Milt Wilson's farm, and is considered a very good price. Mr. Brummett bought a farm near Breeding. Mr. Brummett and family are nice, good people and we can commend them to any community.

Wednesday, August 21, 1918

The weather continues very hot.

We are needing rain very bad.

Geo. Yates, the Buck Brand overall man of Bowling Green, was here the first of the week and spent one night with his uncle Charlie.

Mrs. C.O. Moss and sons accompanied by Miss Mollie Flowers, visited at Willisburg and Louisville a few days of last week.

Mrs. Millie Hill and her daughter, Ruth, and Mr. W.B. Hill spent a few days of last week visiting relatives at Jamestown.

Quite a number of tobacco barns are being erected in this section at this time, preparatory for taking care of the present crop of tobacco.

Strong Hill of Glasgow and Mr. Alexander, of Burkesville, commercial men out of Louisville, were calling on their trade in our city last week.

Mr. John  Wes Sparks , of Horse Cave, visited his brother, Charlie, of our town, who is in very bad health, a day or two last week.

Mrs. T.I. Smith, Jr., of Cane Valley, has been employed as assistant teacher here. She went on duty last Monday. Miss Betty L. Butler is principal and it goes without says that she has a very full school when it requires an assistant.

(Untitled wedding announcement)

(The Adair County News, January 16, 1918.)

Miss Lula Moss, daughter of Mr. Thos. Moss, and Mr. T.I. Smith, Jr., of Cane Valley, were married in Louisville the 22nd day of November [1917]. The bride had lived near Weed.

Dudley & Son are receiving quite a lot of wheat at this time at $2.00 per bu. They are also paying $1.50 per bu., for corn. Not much corn in this section for sale at this time.

Mrs. Johnson, an evangelist of Lincoln county, has been holding a series of meetings at Smith's Chapel, better known as Jaybird, near this place. There is great [interest] manifested in the meeting and very large attendance.

George Coffey, Deputy Sheriff, of Columbia, was in our midst a day or so last week. George always get what he comes after when he comes.

Mr. Elmer Keen, one of our efficient merchants, has been confined to his room for the past week with fever and other complications.

Rev. Bennett, of the L.W.T. [Lindsey Wilson Training] School, of Columbia, called in to see us on his return from Hiseville and other points, last Friday. Mr. Bennett informed us that the prospects were flattering for a fine school this fall.

Geo. W. Dudley sold his farm last week to his son, Allen, for $2,500. This farm is known in this section as the John A. Coffey farm. Several acres of bottom land. Mr. Dudley will move to our town in the near future.

Mr. D.C. Wheeler, one of our best farmers and of our up-to-date businessmen, made a trip over to  Cumberland county, near Burkesville, with a view of buying a farm in that section, last week. We are informed that the deal is not closed yet.

J.A. Wilmore, of Lexington, who enlisted in Uncle Sam's service and was assigned to Vancouver, Wash., writes...that he is delighted with his new field of labor; that he was daily gaining strength and had plenty of work to do. He takes it that the army life is very thing he has been needing.

Wednesday, September 4, 1918

We are very dry in this section.

Charlie Sparks, who has been sick for a number of weeks, is improving at this time.

Miss Mollie Flowers returned from Columbia the first of the week.

Geo. T. Flowers lost a very valuable mule colt from the effects of getting tied up a wire fence, while in pasture, last week.

J.F. Pendleton, the well-known stock man of Greensburg, was here the first of the week, looking after cattle.

Mr. Wisemore, an insurance man of Louisville, spent one night here, last week. He works insurance through the banks of the State.

Mrs. Mollie Dohoney and her daughter visited friends, in our city, a few days of last week.

The protracted services that has been going on at Union for the past month, is growing in interest and attendance. Fine sermons are being delivered by the pastor, B.T. Watson. The prospects are flattering for a good meeting.

D.C. Wheeler sold, last week, to Archie Sullivan, of Keltner, one of the best pair of three-year-old mules that has gone out of this section of county for many years for five hundred dollars.

H.A. Walker, of Columbia, was through this section of county one day last week, looking after mules and cattle. He is on the market for heavy cattle and large mules at a fancy price.

Our farmers in this vicinity for the past week, have been putting in their time, cutting and housing tobacco and we are glad to say that the crop of the weed through this immediate community is considerably better than was thought it would be several weeks ago. We feel safe in saying that we will have over half a crop this year. Quite a lot has begun to cure and, we understand it is of a fine color. Also our corn crop is much better that we thought it would be a few weeks ago.

[The following, as originally published in the newspaper, was one long paragraph.--ed.]

There has been some of the largest land deals pulled off in this section this week that has been for many years. T.W. Dowell bought from Curt Yarberry his farm, for twelve thousand dollars. This farm is known in this section as the Allen Keltner farm and is beyond a doubt one of the best in this section. To prove this to you we will give you just a little estimate of what Mr. Yarberry will reap from the proceeds of this farm, this year. While it has not by no means been a first class season he will reap six thousand dollars worth of corn, tobacco and wheat. This estimate has been given to your reporter by conservative men. We regret to lose Mr. Yarberry and his good family from our community.

Dr. L.C. Nell sold to Albert Brummett his house and lot in our town and his farm nearby known as the Jo Yates farm for $8750. This is a good home for anyone and we are glad to have Mr. Brummett and family to locate with us.

Strong Hill sold his dwelling house, where he lives in our town to Geo. W. Dudley for $950. We are also glad to have Mr. Dudley and family to locate in our town. We have not learned where the Dr. and his family or Mr. Hill and his family will locate, but we take it as they both own land here yet in abundance, they will remain with us. We hope so at least. We don't feel that we are able to lose any good people at this time.

Wednesday, September 11, 1918

The weather has been cool for the past day or so.

We have had fine rains this week.

R.D. and Odis Moss, of Greensburg, spent a day or so on our city the first of the week.

Dr. S. Simmons, who has been very sick for the past few days, does not improve fast.

Several of our young men left us this last Friday, to enlist in Uncle Sam's service.

Rev. D.L. Vance returned from Breeding Thursday, where he had been engaged in revival services, assisted by Rev. [Granville] Jaggers, of the M.E. Church.

Messrs. Jo Williams and J.B. Coffey, of Columbia, were in our midst last Thursday, advertising the horse sale at Columbia on the 9th.

T.W. Dowell spent a day or so at Camp Knox, last week, looking over the surveying of some land that he had recently sold.

Strong Hill and L.H. Fielders spent one day last week at Breeding, looking after a saw mill. Mr. Fielder_ has quite a lot of lumber to saw during the fall months.

B.B. Janes lost a very valuable milch cow one day last week from eating too much green corn.

Trenton Gist left us last Thursday morning for the Lone Star State, where he calculates on entering school. [Young Mr. Gist was a few weeks short of sixteen when he left the Bluegrass State for Texas that late summer of 1918. When he departed this world in early January, 1978, he was a resident of old Adair.--ed.]

There has been during the past month a number of cases of whooping cough and a few cases of flux in this section. A few cases of the whooping cough have proved fatal. We hope the worst is over, now.

J.H. Moore, who lives in the Weed community, and also runs a grist mill, was in our midst last Thursday, and informed us that he had ground several bushels of corn that had grown in that section in 1918.

There has been in town during the past week several of the farmers from the Keltner community and they informed us that their tobacco crops are just simply fine and a few of them have sold their tobacco at prices from 35 to 50 cent per pound.

[The following, as originally published in the newspaper, was one long paragraph.--ed.]

One of the saddest deaths that has happened in our community for a number of years, took place on Thursday afternoon, when the news was spread that Charlie Gowen had died from the effects of getting his hand sawed off in a shingle machine.

Mr. Gowen and Mr. England, his partner, had just erected a shingle machine near Mr. Gowen's residence, in the Weed community and had just started the machine when Mr. Gowen got his hand caught in the machine, sawing off most of his right hand. His suffering cannot be described.

A physician was summoned at once. All that could have been done was done. His suffering was so intense that it affected his heart and it was all soon over.

Charlie, as he was better known by us all, was a good man. A man that everybody loved, and we know that when the summons came he was ready. He leaves a devoted wife and two children, father, mother, with a host of relatives to weep over his sudden departure.

His funeral was preached by his pastor, Rev. Scott, of the Baptist church, before a large audience, at Big Creek church, on Friday afternoon, and his remains interred in the family cemetery, near the church, to await the resurrection morn.

Wednesday, September 25, 1918

We have had a little frost, the first of the season.

Dr. S. Simmons is again on the stage of action.

Quite a number of our citizens attended county court at Columbia the first Monday.

Mrs. W.P. Flowers, of Columbia, visited here a day or so the first of the week.

One hundred and forty men between the ages of eighteen [words apparently missing], and forty-six colored men registered here last Thursday, preparatory to their patriotic duty.

Cordie Wilson and Dave walker passed through here last Friday, en route from Greensburg, with Delbert Jones, for charges preferred against him in Green county.

Charlie Sparks continues to improve, but not as fast as he would like.

George W. Dudley bought a house and lot in our town last week, from E.E. Nell. It is a very desirable piece of property.

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Penick, of Louisville, visited their father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. N.H. Moss, of our vicinity, a few days of last week.

Miss Mollie Flowers spent a few days in Greensburg the first of the week.

L.B. Cain sold, last week, to Willis Coomer, one hundred acres of land near where Mr. Cain lives, for three thousand dollars. This makes Mr. Coomer a good farm and a very desirable home.

Miss Mollie Flowers, Master James Moss, G.T. Flowers, W.L Grady J.J. Parson, Strong Hill and Gilbert Parson, of our city, attended the State Fair, in Louisville, this week

Mr. and Mrs. C.O. Moss, Miss Bettie Lee Butler and Mrs. T.I. Smith attended the show at Columbia last Wednesday night.

Mr. Parson, of Sulphur Well section, bought a number of cattle in this section, last week, at prices from 7 to 10 cents per pound.

Messrs. Ollis Rose and Will Ed Hunter, who left us for the service of Uncle Sam, last week, write their people that they are arrived down in the southern climate and are liking that section of the country fine.

Are farmers are the most busy people we have these days. They are putting in their time cutting tobacco, pulling fodder, cutting corn, making sorghum, all just ready at this time. Not a man in this section now that is out of employment. We are glad to say that we have a fairly good crop of all, and we are getting it all saved in good time.

L.B. Cain sold last week, a very valuable young mule to L. Richardson for $200.

Judge N.H. Moss accompanied his son and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Penick, to Greensburg, last Friday.

Born, to the wife of G.E. Nell, on the 10th, a son. Mother and child doing well. [The child was George O. Nell; Mrs. Nell was the former Miss Ella Rose.--ed.]

Wednesday, October 2, 1918

[The first entry is an classified ad included with the Gradyville newsletter.--ed.]

I have just received my new line of Fall and Winter Millinery goods, and will be glad for all my old customers to call and see them before buying. The prices will be right. /s/ Mrs. Millie Hill.

W.E. Hunter, who was stationed at Camp Wheeler, Ga., has returned home, receiving an honorable discharge.

We had plenty of frost last week.

Tobacco cutting is about all over in this section.

Thos. Gowen is in a very critical condition. The end of his life is near.

Pendleton, Hobson & Bridgewater, of Greensburg, received twenty-five hundred dollars worth of hogs here, last week, at prices from 16 to 18 cents per pound.

Col. J.N. Coffey, of Columbia, was called to do surveying, here, last Friday.

Mr. and Mrs. Conor, of Covington, Okla., daughter and son-in-law, or Mr. R.O. Keltner, spent last week with Mr. Keltner and family.

Mr. and Mrs. John Gowen, of Edmonton, were by the bedside of their sick brother, Thos. Gowen, one day last week.

Mrs. Millie Hill is receiving a big line of fall hats this week.

D.L. Vance is attending annual Conference, this week, at Madisonville.

Strong Hill purchased last week from Robert Breeding, at Breeding, a couple of saw mill outfits.

Services at Union church on the first Sunday in October. Everybody invited to attend.

Rev. O.P. Bush filled his last appointment with us last Saturday and Sunday. Mr. Bush is a good preacher and we regret his resignation.

Rev. O.P. Bush Accepts Scott County Call.

(Excerpted from an article in the Adair County News, September 25, 1918.)

After a pastorate in Columbia of nearly six years, Rev. O.P. Bush, of the local Baptist church, has resigned to accept a call to the church at Great Crossing, three miles from Georgetown, Ky... The church under his care has had great prosperity in every way. The other churches, Zion, Gradyville, and Milltown that have had his services as pastor, will feel his loss as keenly as will the church in town...

A little child of George Parson has been dangerously sick for the past month with a complication of troubles.

Our road from this place to Bliss is being put in fine condition. The hands have been working on it the past two weeks.

The pie supper given by our efficient teachers, Miss Butler and Mrs. Smith, last Saturday night, as the school building, was largely attended. The exercises rendered by their pupils were fine. The net proceeds of the pies that were sold amounted to $20.15, which amount was donated to the Red Cross. The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L.E. Thomas, has the cromo[??] for her pie, bringing the most money, which was $3.00.

Land sales continue in this part of the county. Porter England sold his farm near here, to Mr. Garrison, for $1,500. T.W. Dowell sold his farm known as the J.D. Walker farm, to Dr. L.C. Nell for $6,500. He also sold to Rodgers & Blades, of Keltner, his farm, known as the Diddle farm, for $10,000. These two farms are considered the best farms in this part of the county. Mr. Dowell is thinking of buying a farm near Campbellsville. Mr. Dowell, beyond a doubt, is one of the best business men in this part of the county, and we regret to give him up.

We are glad to note that George W. Dudley and family are now citizens of our town, having moved into his new property.

Wednesday, October 9, 1918

We are very dry down this way.

Our farmers are busy sowing wheat and making sorghum this week.

T.W. Dowell returned home from Campbellsville the first of the week.

John Q. Alexander, the well-known dry goods man, of Louisville, made our town this week, and as usual had a good business.

Roy Walker & Son, of Nell, were in our midst last Friday.

Mr. W.A. Hindman, of Milltown section, called in to see us last Friday. Mr. Hindman is looking fine and gets around as well as he did twenty-five years ago.

H.A. Walker, wife and daughter and Miss Mabel Hindman visited relatives here last Saturday and Sunday.

Thos. Gowen, who had a stroke of paralysis ten days ago, remains in a very critical condition.

Several from our town attended Fiscal Court at Columbia last week.

W.L. Grady was at Greensburg a day or so the first part of the week, on business.

Mr. and Mrs. Gaither Bryant, Pettisfork section, visited the family of Mr. E.R. Baker of our city a day or two last week. Mr. Bryant is looking fine, and reports he is enjoying the best of health in his old and declining days. [Mr. Bryant departed this world on the first day of August, 1920, aged 80 years.--ed.]

We are glad to note that Mr. and Mrs. W.P. Flowers are now citizens of our town, having moved back from Columbia.

Mrs. Lula Smith, who has been our assistant teacher here for the past two months in our public school, resigned and has accepted a position in a school down South, and will leave for the Southern climate in a few days. We recommend her as one of our best teachers.

T.W. Dowell closed a deal to-day, selling his farm known as the Robertson farm, on Big Creek, to Nell Bros., for $12,000 dollars. This deal closes out all the land that Mr. Dowell bought from Mr. J.A. Diddle, all the land bringing him something near $29,000, the three farms. Mr. Dowell has bought a farm at Campbellsville and will move there at once.

Wednesday, October 16, 1918

We had a good rain today.

H.A. Walker, of Columbia, was here last week looking after cattle.

Charlie Sparks continues to improve slowly.

Liberty Loan meeting was very well attended here. The first week the subscription list was between three and four thousand dollars.

A.N. Bridgewaters & Son, of Greensburg, received cattle at this place the first of the week, at prices from 6 to 8 cents per pound.

Dr. L.C. Nell, wife and son are visiting relatives, at Owenton, this week.

Arvest Hill, of Adairville, is with his parents for a few days rest in our city at this time.

Miss Christine Nell, after several days visiting relatives at Edmonton, returned home last week.

W.P. Nunnally, the well-known drug man of Cave City, called on his customers here the first of the week.

Squire Thos. Gowen, one of our oldest citizens, died near this place on the 5th, with a complication of diseases. [Mr. Gowen was aged 76 years.-ed.]

Strong Hill spent the largest part of the week at Toria, where he is putting in a new saw mill.

W.C. Hill, wife and son will take rooms at their brother's Strong Hill, for the winter months.

Our old friend, Will Diddle, of Adairville, called in to see us just for a few minutes on his return from the State of Michigan, where he had been looking after autos. Will is looking fine and says he is enjoying the best of health.

Our school was called off last Tuesday on account of the well-known disease, flu. We are glad to note that we have no cases in our town at the present time and our public gatherings and visitings are all cut out for the time being. Our efficient teacher, Miss Bettie Butler, returned to her home, near Columbia. [The raging influenza pandemic of 1918 was just beginning in the U.S. in late September and early October.--ed.]

Wednesday, October 30, 1918

We have fine tobacco stripping weather this week.

Strong Hill is receiving his planing mill this week.

J.L. Walker, B.E. Rowe, of Columbia, and U.N. Whitlock, of Bliss, were in our midst last Tuesday in the interest of the 4th Liberty Loan.

L.B. Cain delivered some nice cattle to Phelps Bros., of Columbia, last week at fancy prices.

Mrs. J.A. Hill, of Adairville, is on the sick list at her father-in-law's, Mr. Strong Hill, this week with the "flu."

Mrs. J.A. Black, of North, Ind., is visiting her father, T.W. Dowell, this week.

Willie Wilson and family, of Portland, Ind., are in for a few days visit with their relatives in our town.

Quite a number of our carpenters and workmen left for Stithton last week to engage in government work. [An army cantonment was under construction in Hardin County near the village of Stithton. Although the site was abandoned, unfinished, as soon as World War I ended, work eventually resumed, and the site became known as Camp Henry Knox, later Fort Knox.--ed.]

 

J.D. Lowe, the well-known shoe man, of Columbia, called to see us on his return from his western trip in this county, one day last week.

D[r]. S. Simmons informed us recently that during twenty-four hours he had visited seventy cases of the flu.

We have received the sad news of the death of our kinsman and friend, Robert Wilmore, son of Mr. and Mrs. L.M. Wilmore, of Bogard, Mo. We have not heard the particulars of his death. His dear mother and father have the sympathy of our community.

From Bogard, Mo.

(Excerpted from an undated letter published in the November 6, 1918 Adair County News.)

Editor News:

If you will allow me space in your good paper, I will notify my friends of the sickness and sad death of my son, Robert [Wilmore], which occurred at Fort Riley, Kan., October 14.

He was called to Camp Funston July 25. On September 21st, he came home on a 36 hour furlough--was feeling fine; had gained 15 pounds since he had been there; liked his work fine. A few days later he was taken with the influenza and was transferred to the hospital at Fort Riley. On Thursday October 10, I received a telegram saying Robert was seriously ill with pneumonia.

I left at once--reached his bedside Friday noon, found him resting very well but awfully weak... Saturday morning Robert seemed a little better; Sunday morning the Doctor said a little improvement over yesterday, but still seriously ill. About 11 o'clock I noticed he was getting restless and his breathing fast.

So I sent a telegram for his mother and her brother, Burton Browning, to come at once. I saw he was going fast and I felt I could'nt stand to give him up so far from home and none of the family with him but me... I am so glad I was permitted to be with him the last few hours of his life. He talked about his brother and sisters; said he would like to see them but it was too risky for them to come. There were so many afflicted, visitors had to wear masks.

Robert counted how many hours it would take his mother and uncle to reach him. But poor fellow, he passed away about an hour before they arrived.

After the body had been prepared it was shipped to Bogard where religious services were held, attended by many friends.

Robert gave his life for his country, a great honor.

            /s/ Luther M. Wilmore

Gillam Breeding sold last week to L.B. Cain two yearling cattle for $135.

There have been a few small crops of tobacco sold in this section for 30c per pound. Some of our farmers are holding their crops for more money.

T.W. Dowell bought something like a car load of hogs last week at prices less $1.50 of the Louisville market. Mr. Dowell will feed these hogs for a future market.

Since the services and Sunday School have been called off we scarcely see any one in our town on the Sabbath day.

There is scarcely a family in our town but what some member is confined to their bed, and in some families there are several with the "flu." We are glad to note that at present time no one is dangerously sick.

Wednesday, November 6, 1918

We are having plenty of rain.

We are glad the prospects are fine for cooler weather.

Quite a number of cases of flu in this section.

M.W. Dowell was at Campbellsville a day or so the first of the week.

Mrs. R.O. Keltner has been confined to her room for a week with pneumonia fever.

Logan Hagan, of Tompkinsville, called in to see us while en route for Rowena, last week.

Strong Hill and Tom Rodgers were at Campbellsville a day or so the first of the week.

G.E. Nell, J.J. Thompson, J.J. Sneed, and J.E. Richard were at Liletown last Saturday.

The baby of Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Hill, of Adairville, who has been dangerously sick at their father's, Mr.

Strong Hill, of our city, for the past week or so, is improving at this time.

All our young men who went to Stithton a week or so ago to engage in work for Uncle Sam, have returned. They report too much sickness down in that section.

Mack Coomer, the well-known tobacco buyer in the Western part of this county, was in our midst a few days ago, and reported that he was on the market for a few good crops of tobacco at the market price. Mr. Coomer has bought a few crops of Burley at 30 cts per lb., but does not want any more at that price until the market gets better, but would be glad to buy a few crops of dark tobacco at the market price.

T.W. Dowell is feeding two hundred hogs, preparatory for the Louisville market about the first of January.

We are glad to note that Dr. L.C. Nell, who has been confined to his room for several weeks with the flu, is improving at this time, and will be out again in a few days.

Will Lyon, of Campbellsville, and Strong Hill, of Glasgow, two well-known commercial men, were calling on their trade in our city, last Friday.

Mr. Charlie Sparks, who has been in feeble health for some time, does not improve fast, but we are glad to report that he is able to be on the stage of action.

Wednesday, November 13, 1918

Elmer Keen made a business trip to Lebanon last Wednesday.

Our farmers completed their wheat sowing this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Arvest Hill returned to their home at Adairville last.

Mr. White, the well-known salesman of Armour & Co., of Louisville, was in our midst last Friday.

Mrs. R.O. Keltner, who has been confined to her room for several weeks with fever, is improving fast at this time.

Dudley & Son have had some improvement done on their mill in our city which adds greatly to their convenience.

D.C. Wheeler purchased a very fine mare from T.W. Dowell, last week, for the consideration of $250. This mare is known in this section as the H.A. Walker mare.

Misses Dunbar, of Columbia, were the guests of Mrs. L.B. Cain a day or so of last week.

Mr. Arthur Curry, of Sparksville, who rented the farm from T.W. Dowell, spent several days last week sowing wheat on it. We are very glad to have Mr. Curry and family in our community again.

Several of our citizens went over to Columbia, expecting it to be the first day of our circuit court, but was disappointed and will make the trip over next Monday.

Our town was draped in sorrow last Monday morning when the news was heralded that John Sanders, was dead. He was a young man that every body loved, and was only sick but a few days with flu. He left evidence that he was prepared to meet his God. His father, brothers and sisters have the sympathy of this community in this their hour of sad bereavement. [Aged 17 years.--ed.]

T.W. Dowell has closed a deal with Dudley & Son closing out all his lands on Big Creek. This deal puts Mr. Dudley in possession of some good timbered land as well as some fie bottom land on Big Creek.

The election passed off very quietly here, and the results did not please at all. However, we can say of a truth; that we are glad that the old State of Kentucky is still Democratic.

Our people down this way are getting very anxious, for the time to come around again when we can have church services and Sunday school. We are lost in our town on the Sabbath Day without having some kind of religious services and we are glad to say that our sick people are all improving and we have no new cases of influenza in this section anywhere, that we know of. There has been three or four deaths in this vicinity from the effects of this dreadful disease. We trust the worst is over and our people will all be well again in a very few days.

Wednesday, November 20, 1918

There was few hogs slaughtered here the first of the week.

J.J. Parson and his son, Gilbert, left for Louisville the first of the week.

Mrs. Amos Keltner, who has been confined to her room for several weeks with fever, has about recovered.

George Coffey, deputy sheriff, of Columbia, was in this section a day or so of last week.

J.H. Burris received quite a lot of turkeys at this place last Saturday at 25cts per pound, preparatory for Thanksgiving.

Quite a number of our citizens attended court in Columbia last Monday.

Mr. Thos. Moss, a well-known citizen of Weed community, has been very sick for the past week with a complication of troubles. [Mr. Moss died in early March, 1920, aged 57 years.--ed.]

T.W. Dowell spent a day or so at his farm at Campbellsville, last week.

John Pickett, the well-known insurance man of Campbellsville, spent several days in our community last week working insurance. John gets the business every time he comes.

Cager Coomer, one of Sparksville's thriving merchants, was in our midst last Friday and reported everything getting along nicely in this section.

W.L. Grady attended Dick Tandy's sale last Thursday and reported a very large attendance and property selling very high. [In an ad placed in the November 13 edition of the News, Mr. Tandy described the location of the sale as "...my farm, the Wm. Atkins place, 3 miles Southwest of Columbia, on Milltown road..."--ed.]

Titus Price, of Columbia, was working fire insurance in our city a day or so last week.

Col. J.N. Coffey, of Columbia, was called to do a lot of surveying in this section one day last week.

John Wes Sparks and family, Horse Cave, spent several days with their brother, Charlie and family, of our city.

Finis Finn, of Keltner, was in this community last week looking after milch cows. He bought one from T.W. Darnell for $75.00 and one from Emma Rupe for $45.00.

W.L. Grady spent a day or so at Greensburg last week, shipping stock down to the southern market.

Dr. Basil Taylor, of Greensburg, and Dr. Harlan Simpson, of Breeding, and Dr. L.C. Nell, of our city, operated on a son of Kenneth Pile last Thursday for appendicitis. The case was a very bad one and the young man died the next day. [The deceased was identified elsewhere as Bell Pile.]

The flu that has been in this community for the past month or so, has not abated entirely. There is a case or two in our town at this time and out in the community a mile or so there is a number of cases and some are very bad. There has been several deaths. While in conversation in regard to the disease with Dr. Simmons a day or so ago, he informed us that her had waited on five hundred and fifty cases in his practice, and there had been only four or five deaths from the disease.

Wednesday, December 4, 1918

Quite a number of hogs were slaughtered in this community this week.

Strong Hill and J.J. Parson spent a few day in Louisville last week.

W.B. Moore and family have moved to the property, known as the T.F. Gowen [place.]

Mike Winfrey, of Columbia, was looking after some unfinished business in this community last week, a day or so.

Henry Keltner has proven himself to be one of the best marksmen in this part of the county. He killed a red fox last Friday, running at full speed over one hundred and fifty yards off.

W.L. Grady has informed us that he was gathering some of the finest corn he ever made in this section of county. Mr. Grady made a bountiful yield this season.

The entire family of Mr. Charlie Sparks are and have been confined with the flu. They are all improving at this time.

There have been several crops of both Dark and Burley tobacco sold in this section during the past two weeks at prices ranging from 15 to 30 cents per lb.

The family of Walker Wilson have been in serious condition with flu for the past week or ten days. There has been two deaths in his family and several others dangerously sick.

Born to the wife of Rev. D.L. Vance, on the 15th of November, a son. Mother and child are getting along nicely.

Born, to the wife of Luke Sherrill, on the 10th of November, a daughter. Mother and child doing well.

Mr. Merida Wilson, who has been living in our town for a number of years, bought him a farm a few days ago, and will in the near future move to it. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are citizens we can commend to any community.

John Q. Alexander, the popular dry goods man of Louisville, was calling on his trade in our town last Wednesday and as usual had a fine business.

Miss Stella Keltner and Mrs. T.I. Smith passed through out place last Thursday en route for Campbellsville, to take the train for the Southern climate, where they will be engaged for several months teaching. We understand that Miss Ruth Holladay will join them in the near future in the same capacity.

(Pyrus newsletter, Adair County News, December 4, 1918.)

Miss Stella Keltner received a telegram, last Tuesday, November 19, from...Greenville, Ala., to come at once [at] $75.00 a month for teaching... She left for that place, the 21st, in company with Mrs. Lula Smith, who has a position as teacher in Georgia...

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hancock, of the state of Indiana, are visiting their mother in our city, at this time.

Uncle Buck Cook, one of our oldest citizens, has been confined to his room for several days with a dislocation of shoulders.

Wednesday, December 11, 1918

We are having beautiful weather this week.

Miss Shirley, of Milltown, [is] visiting her aunt, Mrs. Bettie Dowell, this week.

Miss Bettie L. Butler and sister, of Heraline, were the guests of Mrs. C.O. Moss, of our city, this week.

Mrs. and Mrs. Thos. Dowell visited relatives in Metcalfe county a day or so the first of the week.

We are glad to note that the flu has abated to some extent in this section.

George E. Nell is in Louisville this week.

Dr. J.A. Yates, a well-known physician of Edmonton, was shaking hands with is many friends in our town last Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. McKinney and Mr. and Mrs. [name omitted; see note following] of Jamestown, spent a day or so with their mother, Mrs. W.P. Flowers, of our city last week. [Mrs. (Walter) McKinney was Mrs. Flower's step-daughter; her dau. & son-in-law of Jamestown were Mr. & Mrs. Veston Holt.--ed.]

Mr. J.W. Sparks, of Cave City and his brother, Nell Sparks who is in Uncle Sam's employment in the navy, spent a day with their brother Charlie, who is in very critical condition at this time. [Mr. Charlie Sparks died just over a year later, on December 22, 1918, aged 43 years.--ed.]

Mr. T.W. Dowell, and Mr. Cassady, of East Fork, spent a day or so at Campbellsville last week. We understand that Mr. Cassady is prospecting for a location.

Messrs. Blades and Rodgers, of Keltner community, who bought a farm from T.W. Dowell, near this place, are moving to their new home this week.

Our farmers are about all through gathering corn down this way, and we are glad to report that their yield was much better than they expected before they began gathering.

We have a few cases of whooping cough in this community, mostly confined to the family of Mr. J.M. Sanders, but not in a serious form at present.

Messrs. Bridgewater & Son, of Greensburg, came over last Monday and received from T.W. Dowell $2,200 worth of hogs, paying from 14 to 15 cents per pound. This is the largest sum of money ever paid any one man for hogs in this part of the country. The larger part of these hogs were raised by Mr. Dowell and grown on his own farm. By the way your reporter weighed this lot of hogs, and will take the liberty to say that old man Dowell could tell in 5 pounds what any one hog would weigh. ["Old man Dowell" was about 56 at the time.--ed.]

Wednesday, December 25, 1918

We have had unusual warm weather for the past few days.

We have several cases of flu in this community at present.

We are glad to note that Charlie Sparks is considered better this week.

W.L. Fletcher and Otha Moore spent a day or so at Cloyd's Landing, this week, visiting their relatives.

Walter Sparks, of Clear Land, Ohio, spent a few days with his brother and family this week.

Luke Sherrill and Geo. W. Burris attended the tobacco sales at Campbellsville the first of the week and they were very well pleased with the sales of their tobacco.

Mrs. Julia A. Baker, who spent the summer with her daughter, Mrs. S. Mills of Liletown, has returned and will remain with her sons, at this place during the winter months.

Mr. Garrison, who was reared in the vicinity of Milltown, but for the past few years, has been residing in Barren Co., has recently bought a farm near this place, and moved to it...

We are glad to note that the family of Mr. J.M. Sanders did not have the whooping cough as we reported last week. Only a bad cough that follows the flu.

Several loads of tobacco were taken from this section to the loose leaf market at Glasgow last week. We have not learned how the market opened up, but we take it they received satisfactory prices.

Mr. Wolford Wilson, of Breeding community, was in our midst last Thursday, and informed us that he attended the Burkesville lose leaf sales, and that he had a small crop of Burley tobacco on the market that brought him 37 cents per lb. Also stated that good Burley was selling for good money, but the dark was a little bit draggy.

Mr. Ernest Yates, who has been away from this section for several months, spent a few days with his old Uncle Charlie, last week. We were all glad to see him again.

Mr. and Mrs. James Hoy and their son, James, accompanied by their [his] mother, Mrs. Fannie Hoy, of McGregor, Texas, are visiting their relatives and friends in our city at this time. They have not made up their mind as to whether they will locate here permanently at this time or return to the Lone Star State. [Mrs. Hoy was the daughter of Mrs. W.P. Flowers.--ed.]

Mr. John D. Lowe, the well-known Shoe salesman of Columbia, called in to see us one day last week, while en route for Fry.

Mr. T.W. Dowell, is moving his belongings from this community to his home that he has bought at Campbellsville. We regret to see Mr. Dowell and family leave our community. We can say of a truth there never was a better business man, a more accommodating man...than T.W. Dowell. He was always ready to assist anyone that needed help, and we have the first time to ever hear of this man speaking a harmful word of his neighbors. Your reporter has been closely connected with him in a business way for a number of years. He is strictly honest and straight in all his dealing, and we heartily commend him to any community wherever he may locate.    

END

Copyright January 2007 by Cyrus

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